205 reputation
17
bio website twitter.com/julianlloyd
location Los Angeles
age
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Feb 18 at 7:14

It’s happening to you.


Mar
2
comment Do niche web applications still strive for legacy browser support?
Thanks for sharing some of your experiences. I'm definitely feeling more justified in raising the "minimum specs" of the app to include a modern browser... treading on new territory—my first app :)
Apr
26
comment What are the rules of thumb for margins in web design?
@Sascha - If you mean along the lines of the Gestalt Principal, then yes--there are explicitly defined behaviors of visual perception... but doesn't cognitive psychology explore visual perception in a reactionary way? I have yet to learn of a definitive rule to make something "look good," other than maybe the use of patterns and a grid over arbitrary shapes and placement; I may be a hopeless romantic for art, lol.
Apr
26
comment What are the rules of thumb for margins in web design?
@Sascha - I was under the impression that em responded to user defined stylesheet font sizes, so that it scaled with respects to their input... not just the zoom feature of browsers--that's been scaling properly with px since I can remember.
Apr
14
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
Very well communicated. I think this question is a bit subjective for Stackexchange, and in spite of all the other great answers--I feel your answer is a great fit for a "preferred answer."
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
I like your thought process... but what about a node near the edge of the canvas--the user could feasibly "lose" a node off the side and be unable to grab it. I've contemplated new node pushing the old node as you suggest, but I'm not sure how to make the "momentum" shift so it would slide up/down the boundary of the canvas ... nor how to account for other nodes it may collide with during "moving out of the way."
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - Also, could you elaborate on why double click for node creation disagrees with you? Double click "selects" or "activates" in traditional operating systems, which I equated to "activating" the relevant portion of the canvas with a node.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Marjan - Interesting--cursor feedback is easily implemented... so potentially for "beginning" users, I could use the toolbar click-to-canvas-click. I fear my question is too subjective for stackexchange lol, but I love the brainstorming!
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
Clicking on a node would select the node--whereas clicking (and holding) the canvas would result in the draggable behavior... I think we're on the same page on that one. I read an article on Learnability vs. Usability (or something to that effect,) that explored something similar, where not all functionality needs to be immediately obvious--with "advanced functionality" available to accommodate the "power user." I'll have to explore the ramifications of implementing keyboard shortcuts (and the impact on mobile browsers,) but good idea!
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - 1) I'm actually not 100% on how the canvas will behave; I'm thinking that it may only need draggable behavior on smaller resolutions. People seem accustomed to single click-n-drag (google maps) so I'm not sure I want to get "fancy." 2) I suppose the nodes don't need to be named immediately, but the intent is that the user will arrange the nodes based on their name... so to arrange the nodes without explicitly defining their names, is possible--but someone would have to be "naming the nodes in their head" as they go.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - Maybe a "long press" or "long click" instead of a double click?
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
I was thinking about manually compensating for nodes too close together with a location fix... I'll definitely look into the possibility of this; I know detecting an overlap is simple--but detecting which object, and where it is may be a bit more involved.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Marjan - I actually agree with you... yet I'd still be posed with the same problem of the user "shooting" in a place where the node would overlap :P
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - I didn't mention, but single click 'n dragging on the canvas will allow you to drag the canvas around (similar to google maps)... so single click for node creation isn't an option. Each node needs to be "named" by the user, so 1 fluid movement will still be accompanied by a pause to at the very least name the node.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
Strangely enough, I hadn't considered utilizing multiple methods. I'm not sure I like the "snap to grid" idea, as it undermines some of the application's brand/purpose... but good advice none the less.
Apr
8
comment Is there a particular reason contextual content areas and menus aren't more prevalent in web applications?
@Rahul - To symbolize that their position changes (slides)--think Windows Phone 7.