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Feb
22
comment Am I supposed to lose everything else in my life when I lose my phone number?
I don’t agree that security is the antithesis of good UX. In many scenarios, security is vital to the user’s experience—for example, who would use PayPal if they didn’t feel secure using their service?
Feb
8
comment Should an API documentation include When-to-use and when-not-to-use list?
I agree, leveraging the community for these more subjective requests is perfect. I don’t think the onus should be on the API developer to create it, but rather to support it.
Feb
8
comment Should an API documentation include When-to-use and when-not-to-use list?
I agree examples are an excellent way to help someone learn, but that’s not the same as the author’s expectation of should/shouldn’t instructions, pros/cons, and what 3rd party APIs are "best" to use in conjunction.
Jan
30
comment SaaS plan names for B2C
Also, you’re making a lot of assumptions about the value of each tier to your customers. One might argue the UX-approach would be to test the features with your customers first (perhaps a beta) and see which ones are most valuable before detailing pricing tiers. You could end up with 2 or 5 pricing tiers for example, making this "problem" moot.
Jan
30
comment SaaS plan names for B2C
I think this is more of a business strategy/positioning and psychology question, more than a user-experience puzzle. Generally speaking, if you want people to help with relevant creative names, you’ll need to provide at least an overview of what the service does.
Jan
27
comment How to make irregularly shaped objects / elements look clickable?
+1 Movement would be my preferred choice.
Jan
27
comment What do you expect to happen when you click, Reset All?
I would expect my selections in date picker and filter by to be cleared...
Jan
27
comment How to make irregularly shaped objects / elements look clickable?
@MichaelZuschlag Anecdote—I’ve watched my younger nieces and nephews use digital products, and they are significantly more willing to explore a UI than most adults. I’m not sure if they are better at perceiving UI elements, as much as being more likely to discover them.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
I like your thought process... but what about a node near the edge of the canvas--the user could feasibly "lose" a node off the side and be unable to grab it. I've contemplated new node pushing the old node as you suggest, but I'm not sure how to make the "momentum" shift so it would slide up/down the boundary of the canvas ... nor how to account for other nodes it may collide with during "moving out of the way."
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - Also, could you elaborate on why double click for node creation disagrees with you? Double click "selects" or "activates" in traditional operating systems, which I equated to "activating" the relevant portion of the canvas with a node.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - Maybe a "long press" or "long click" instead of a double click?
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Marjan - I actually agree with you... yet I'd still be posed with the same problem of the user "shooting" in a place where the node would overlap :P
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
@Sascha - I didn't mention, but single click 'n dragging on the canvas will allow you to drag the canvas around (similar to google maps)... so single click for node creation isn't an option. Each node needs to be "named" by the user, so 1 fluid movement will still be accompanied by a pause to at the very least name the node.
Apr
12
comment How do you handle prohibition inside a “free form” interface?
Strangely enough, I hadn't considered utilizing multiple methods. I'm not sure I like the "snap to grid" idea, as it undermines some of the application's brand/purpose... but good advice none the less.
Apr
8
comment Is there a particular reason contextual content areas and menus aren't more prevalent in web applications?
@Rahul - To symbolize that their position changes (slides)--think Windows Phone 7.