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Apr
6
awarded  Yearling
Mar
6
comment Why do speedometers (in the US, at least) go so high?
Questions is why do they go so high over the limit, nobody is arguing it should stop exactly at the maximum allowed speed in a specific jurisdiction.
Mar
6
comment Why do speedometers (in the US, at least) go so high?
@Izhaki Since others have shown that they are not, it's kind of moot.
Mar
6
comment Why do speedometers (in the US, at least) go so high?
You find several clever ways to argue the range of speedometers should be based on the actual limit of what the car can handle or produce… but the problem is that it's not for the most part (see the other answers on this).
Mar
6
comment Why do speedometers (in the US, at least) go so high?
(+1) That's an interesting idea, seems to make sense. The answer would be better if there was some evidence for it, though.
Feb
14
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@Clearer I don't know many either and I would not expect to. The world is big, even in your own country the set of people you know is a very skewed and very tiny sample. To dismiss the notion as “overrated”, you need more than that.
Feb
6
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@jamesqf I am approaching this from a UX perspective, not a technical one so I certainly would not include all that. On the other hand, smartphones are used for some of the most common functions of traditional computers: email/communication, gaming, etc. Email, chat, web surfing or online shopping all involve “direct (human) input of alphanumeric data into computers”, which is what the question was about. Even SMS/texting has changed a lot from the days of the dumb phones with a keyboard to today's smart touch UI that guess what you want to type.
Feb
5
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@jamesqf Well, my point is simply that one way or another, a different input device necessarily implies different patterns of use. If you expect a new input device to work exactly like a keyboard and deride everything else as “not serious” or “a niche”, you are blinding yourself to the real changes in UI. Beyond that, arguing about definitions isn't terribly interesting. It is also purely circular, basically you agree on the facts, just pretend it doesn't count.
Feb
5
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@Clearer And to address the narrow issue with the stats: Those numbers are not raw sales and you can also find reasons to deflate the PC numbers: servers, work computers, etc. Incidentally, many people have been noting that the urge to buy the latest appears weaker with tablets than with tablets.
Feb
5
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
The key point is that it's “real computer-related work” that's becoming a niche today. It's not what computing looks like anymore and that change is very real. Our personal experience with those device is beside the point.
Feb
5
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@Clearer But how do you know that? The statistics I mention don't address the issue directly but do suggest you might be wrong. In countries like RD Congo and Indonesia (to mention two I have some experience with), having only a mobile device is the rule. Even in Europe, I know many people who do own a PC but ultimately use their tablet more often. To be sure, I also know many people who don't like tablets and think they are a fad. If you are like that yourself, it's very easy to get a biased view. I don't know if we are quite there yet but usages are already changing.
Feb
5
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@jamesqf That's exactly the logic I describe in my answer, a bit of a “no true scotsman argument” if you will. Don't misunderstand me, I like those things too but many people don't have a notion of files and directories and don't need them. Defining new devices away as not a “real computer-related work” is purely circular. If you take computer to mean a development workstation as we know it (including its keyboard) then it's always going to have a keyboard but that's trivial.
Feb
5
comment Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
@jamesqf How are smartphones a niche? Speaking of manipulating files and directories is quite telling, that's what's becoming a niche use case nowadays, not even speaking of ssh from a linux machine. That's completely out there in geek territory!
Feb
5
revised Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
added 308 characters in body
Feb
4
answered Why are keyboards still the predominant input device?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Aug
20
comment Rate vs Like/Dislike
@supercat Maybe, maybe not. My point was mostly that the answer is based on a very strong assumption (your comment is itself pretty affirmative, yet does not line up very well with the answer I think). Modern psychology does mostly treat liking as a continuous dimensions, incidentally.
Jun
25
comment How many clicks is too few?
If the number of clicks is negative, something is definitely wrong. Other than that, there are things you will want to keep even with 0 clicks (say legal requirements) so you can't just blindly remove things below a certain threshold.
Apr
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
27
reviewed Approve Should a dot or period (.) get italicized?