720 reputation
1818
bio website wesleymurch.com
location Mystic, CT
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Aug 6 at 20:24

Thanks for your interest.


Nov
3
revised Why is it impossible to deselect HTML “radio” inputs?
added 377 characters in body
Nov
3
comment Why is it impossible to deselect HTML “radio” inputs?
Well, you can usually deselect those real-life radio buttons by pushing them in halfway, but that's besides the point and probably a defect. The wikipedia article outlines the way radios work, but does little to validate the behavior or explain its reasoning. Why shouldn't a user be able to "unpush" a radio? It's the only way to force single-choice besides a dropdown.
Nov
3
comment Why is it impossible to deselect HTML “radio” inputs?
Totally agree, I prefer to have the user explicitly choose "n/a" by selecting the option (as opposed to skipping over the field entirely), but I don't get why the ability to deselect a radio would be a bad idea for any reason - it's just as if the field was in its default, unchecked state.
Nov
3
comment Why is it impossible to deselect HTML “radio” inputs?
Why hack checkboxes and not radios though? "The standard solution is to have a choice which is basically "no choice" - That's exactly what I am trying to avoid (also the client's request). For dropdowns it's OK, because it takes the same amount of room and doesn't need a label, whereas an "empty" radio does need one (just a radio with no label makes no sense and may go unnoticed, but a dropdown with a blank slot is pretty normal). So all-in-all it's more clutter.
Nov
3
asked Why is it impossible to deselect HTML “radio” inputs?
Oct
20
revised How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
added another client's similar question
Oct
20
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
Just got this exact question from a client again, and happily copy/pasted part of your very well-worded answer into my response. Thanks again for the excellent feedback.
Aug
31
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jul
23
accepted How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
Jul
12
awarded  Critic
Jul
12
comment Is The HTML5 Search Form Useful In Terms of Usability
"the browser can also pre-fetch results as you type" is not in any way related to the search input type or browsers, it must be implemented manually with specific javascript/server-side code. In fact, google is using type="text" on all the search inputs and doing all the chrome and functionality manually, nothing to do with HTML5 at all.
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
Yes, there are some truly abominable js-only menus from the past, before CSS really picked up and people realized they don't need javascript for it. Interesting that your clients would omit content for the top level links, I am not experiencing that. Good point about touch devices and also about not using dead links. If for some unlikely reason the css/js (or browser) is busted and the dropdowns don't work, you need a way to navigate to sub-links by hitting the table of contents. This pushes me even further in the direction I previously stated. Thanks for the feedback.
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
Just to be clear: I'm not wondering if or suggesting that clicking the top level should be the trigger to open the submenu (like a desktop app). It should be hover, as you said. odds are the top level link isn't going to be clicked nearly as often - totally agree, which leads me to think that having those links be "dead" is not that bad of an idea. As far as "table-of-contents" goes, I'm starting to lean towards this being the only practical use of navigating somewhere by clicking a top-level link.
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
They did a good job here though, and I like that there aren't nested flyouts (hover over "Outdoors", there are multiple expanded sub categories instead of another hidden submenu), and it works perfectly without javascript (as it should). Of course the links should appear on mouseover, that is the very essence of this kind of navigation (not what I was asking). So to summarize, you suggest "overview" pages only (and always) for top level links?
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
It appears they are inconsistent between the side menu and top menu. In the top, clicking Savings, Services, or Help takes you nowhere, but in the side menu, clicking "Appliances" or "Bath" (top level links) takes you to an overview page for that category. A friend of mine suggested that it depends almost entirely on context, so for instance on Home Depot we know the side menu is for categories, and although I did expect clicking a top level link to take me to an overview, I only clicked it for testing. In all cases I felt inclined to drill down to the last level in order to select something.
Jul
12
revised How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
added 540 characters in body
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
@MarjanVenema: I personally agree, at the very least an overview - but should these links be reserved for "overview" pages only, and never for important content that can't be accessed by other means? This is at least the 3rd client I've had that's mentioned this issue, and I don't do usability testing, so I can only assume there are many other users out there who are confused as well.
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
I guess I'm looking for some kind of "Golden Rule". However, on the demo you linked to, each top level link that contains a submenu, when clicked, provides a landing page that contains a summary of what was in the dropdowns - another solution I proposed. If this is the best case then, should these links always be a summary page, and never contain anything other than that (like important information that cannot be accessed from any other link)?
Jul
12
comment How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?
So to be brief, what do you think? 1. Of course people know to click the top level, it's just "dumb" users who don't realize it. 2. This client has a valid point, the fact that it isn't obvious is a design issue, that can be remedied with a different look. 3. Something else? --- You say that adding an extra link adds to the cognitive load of the user, but suggest "breadcrumbs" (which I am not a fan of..), which seems contradictory (More stuff on the page to process). Besides, I don't want to have to add breadcrumbs to every site that uses a dropdown menu.
Jul
12
asked How do users expect dropdown navigation to work?