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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
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Roving Psychologist.


1d
comment Do nested hierarchies of folders make sense to novice users?
Like everything in psychology there isn't a simple '7 +/- 2' rule' - life's much more complicated. Here's a standard UK phone number which looks like 11 memory digits - but actually it often only behaves like 8 memory digits - 02071234567 due to 'chunking'.
1d
comment Do nested hierarchies of folders make sense to novice users?
Actually if you read the Miller article he argues AGAINST The Magic Number 7 - " What about the seven-point rating scale, the seven categories for absolute judgment, the seven objects in the span of attention, and the seven digits in the span of immediate memory? For the present I propose to withhold judgment. Perhaps there is something deep and profound behind all these sevens, something just calling out for us to discover it. But I suspect that it is only a pernicious, Pythagorean coincidence"
2d
comment Do nested hierarchies of folders make sense to novice users?
I think this is actually a very worthwhile question as so much of using a computer is about storing and finding data in files. Blyk clearly isn't a native English speaker so I'll try to edit the question, if Blyk doesn't update it.
Jan
26
comment A better name for “Non Archived” entries
"Current" ?....
Jan
20
comment Should passwords expire?
I recall some corporate system I worked expired passwords after a period of use. I recall finding it a right pain. I used to cycle through 3 password variations to fool the system...
Jan
15
comment Forcing Users To think up More Complex Passwords / Ease of Remembering Them
A footnote to this: There's clearly an increasing fashion for sites to go demanding a password with a capital letter and a number in it, so I've been forced to come up with a new 'standard' password which meets these criteria for use on sites which don't matter very much...
Jan
15
comment Software project with British documentation for US market
I think its mainly down to the relative sizes of the two countries populations and the exportation of US products such as the US film and TV industry. The British will have far more exposure to American English than the Americans get to British English, so the Americans are less used to British usage.
Jan
14
comment How can employees be subtly reminded that when they talk loud in the cubicle farm corridor they disturb people in the cubicles?
I think this is a UX question because its about 'affordances' - a door handle invites pushing; and a 'something' invites people to talk quietly.
Jan
14
comment Suggestions for labels of different kind of doors/gates
Car / Pedestrian / House ?
Jan
14
comment Are these abbreviations common in programming/image processing?
Which countries will the device be sold in ? - ie what will be native language / dialect (US English, UK English ?) of the users.
Jan
14
comment How can employees be subtly reminded that when they talk loud in the cubicle farm corridor they disturb people in the cubicles?
It would be interesting to see how this works over time: due to 'habituation' people stop noticing a new stimulus in their environment pretty quickly.
Jan
14
comment How can employees be subtly reminded that when they talk loud in the cubicle farm corridor they disturb people in the cubicles?
I've elaborated the answer.
Jan
13
comment How can employees be subtly reminded that when they talk loud in the cubicle farm corridor they disturb people in the cubicles?
That would also be more visually interesting that white painted walls.
Jan
13
comment Why do idle elevators close the doors?
The fire safety issue is well made.
Jan
13
comment Why do idle elevators close the doors?
There are elevators which don't have doors at all... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paternoster So the question could be rephrased about the need for having user operated doors in the first place rather than an automatic guard or fitting the inside of the elevator shelf at the door side with a seemless, low friction material.
Jan
9
comment A word for “not handheld device”?
Good point ! I guess there isn't really a clean line between mobile and non mobile devices.
Jan
8
comment Is there a point at which an interface design can be considered “complete?”
Not so much people changing but fashion certainly does...
Jan
5
comment If users encounter an error in an on-line/web process, typically what proportion actually complain?
I think the basic 'is it easy' rule applies: if you can click 'complain' on screen and fill out a form, more people will do it. If you have to find a phone number and listen to recorded messages about pressing different numbers then less people will bother.
Jan
5
comment A terminology question: differentiating between 'Detailed UX issues' and 'Structural UX issues'?
Thanks Jayfang: it would be useful as an industry if we could come up with a common model and terminology for this so hopefully we'll be able to revisit this.
Jan
5
comment Is there a more effective way to convince users to sign up with their social media accounts?
If you are user testing users you can ask them 'why' they don't want to sign in with Facebook - it will probably be down to the 'not trusting with data' issues which DA01 refers to above.