163 reputation
7
bio website webdeavour.co.uk
location Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom
age 38
visits member for 3 years
seen May 22 '13 at 12:34
UK Government Website Developer. Member of W3C HTML Working Group.

Apr
30
comment Is constantly updating the formatting of a numeric input box a good idea?
Never auto-correct the user's input for them, they might miss it. They might be entering a 'correct' value into the wrong field, so they need your error message, and what they have entered (unmodified), to realise their mistake.
Apr
30
comment Is constantly updating the formatting of a numeric input box a good idea?
I personally never mix input with output, by all means accept the comma separator for input (you should be flexible for input, I've seen some systems even allow you to type "10k" for 10,000), but never enforce a rigid input format. If you want to display the values in a rigid output format, that's great, but there should be no obstacles for input (just validation). I wouldn't wait until focus was lost either, I would wait for the form to be submitted.
Mar
25
comment Should i have two links on my Home Page?
Rule 18, and maybe also 42 and 5. That page has many repeated links itself. For example, there is a list of topics on the left, and in the footer, there is a shorter list of popular topics. It's all about context. I only see duplicate links as an issue if it habitually causes any doubt over the difference between them. That is, based on observation, and not some UX analyst's presumptions.
Mar
25
comment Should i have two links on my Home Page?
According to what usability guidelines? There are two 'about' links on the pages of this website, for example.
Mar
25
comment Does the content of the HTML5 placeholder attribute affect usability?
Labels aren't only important for screen reader users. Sighted users using speech recognition software use them too. As far as I know, it's not possible for a user of speech recognition software user to select a field using its placeholder content, unless it coincides with the label content. HTML5 specification says the placeholder attribute should not be used as a replacement for a label. When redisplaying erroneous forms for correction, you need the user-entered data, and the labels.
Feb
12
comment Do auto tab break the least astonishment principle?
Fast users are going to press tab before they even notice the autotab, but the autotab will be instantaneous, I seen a few sites where that's resulted in me tabbing out of a field before I'd entered anything into it.
Feb
5
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
That's the first time I've heard it referred to as karma! Reputation is merely an indication of how much time one has available to spend contributing to a certain community, and not a reflection of how knowledgeable or experienced one is.
Feb
4
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
So I'm not protecting an old-school approach, I'm protecting usability, the guys that are solving the problem in the wrong place are hurting usability. What is 150 karma?!?!
Feb
4
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
autocomplete=off does not help the user. The user is the beneficiary of usability. If they're happy to use browser-classic features like password storage/autocomplete/the back button, the web designer's duty is to make sure those features remain available. Nielsen knows what's good for users, but he said password masking must stop, but not you must stop it. You don't mask the password, the OS does. Therefore, the OS must stop masking the password, it's not your fight. He could have made that clear. He's not going to deny if the OS did it everywhere, for all passwords, that would be best.
Feb
2
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
... at also appears Windows 8 does this natively, I'm very happy to hear that... except wordpress users will probably wonder why it's not there on those password fields.
Feb
2
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
You're unmasking a password by having it cease to be a password field, so a another person could discover it on-screen using autocomplete, regardless of how well a browser has secured the data internally. I don't understand your karma statement, (the Conservative statement did not make sense to me either) I have been following Jakob for a very long time, long enough to know that usability findings are observations, and you can't recommend solutions right off the bat: nngroup.com/articles/…. Masked should be the default, reveal, opt-in.
Jan
31
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
The WordPress technique doesn't work on IE8, this might be a poor example (because you probably don't care about usability for those users), but imagine the technique fails in other technologies like automated password storage systems or because the password field is now a normal text field and stored in the browser's form auto-complete database unencrypted. You could do some serious damage (unintentionally I understand). Jakob made a grave error recommending the checkbox, the web form is the wrong place to solve the problem.
Jan
31
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
It's not about that, it's a usability observation, the golden rule is not to recommend solutions from them. If password masking is an issue, which I don't doubt, then it's a system-wide issue, not for every web developer to solve independently, inconsistency doesn't help the user. UX is not just web, by the way. Think of password protecting a spreadsheet, there's no simple reset method. Unmasking must be implemented everywhere on a device, and won't always make double-entry obsolete. Solving this is like writing a polyfill before you know what to fill.
Jan
31
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
"keyboard with erased letters": ha ha, I rarely look at my keyboard anyway...
Jan
31
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
I do type masked passwords on phone, that's the default (last letter reveal is understandable since the keyboard is not conventional). Responsive design would be useful. You don't just go making changes because they suit one platform. The issue is you're jumping ahead of the OS/native offering by unmasking passwords outside of the OS/native facility. People stopped using the font element as soon as the browser offered the alternative, you're deviating from standards before they've been set. Not cool. If unmasking was good, the browser should offer it for all password fields.
Jan
31
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
...also the article (nngroup.com/articles/stop-password-masking) that started this, was about login, not registration.
Jan
31
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
They tested all users? Using a real password field will also warn me when CAPSLOCK is enabled. Regardless, there are people that NEED double-entry validation, because their passwords aren't simple to verify like the average person's simple passwords. If you showed any of my passwords to me, I honestly couldn't tell you if it was right or not. I just want to punch it in twice. If visibility is a little check-box option, why isn't double entry?
Jan
30
awarded  Commentator
Jan
30
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
...Revealing my password to me would not help one bit, because I can't verify them. The ONLY way I can verify my password is correct is to type it again. Why? Because I don't know what my passwords are. I play keyboards, my password technique is to pick a tune, and play it as if the QWERTY row are the white keys and the numbers are the black keys (E.g: Inspector Gadget: qw3rt35wr3qw3rti7). All I remember is which tune I'm playing, what key it's in, how much of the tune to play. @Dean's answer below covers this, and is the reason you STILL need to ask for the password twice.
Jan
30
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
Do you allow long passwords/phrases? So long, the password field scrolls so that not all of the password is in view? If you do, they're still hidden! Also if it's not hidden, you're probably not using a password field (as in <input type="password">). So you could be swindling some poor users out of some browser-behaviour also attributed to usability or accessibility (How would you know? You can't experience everybody's set up). Why don't you just stick to what users expect? Password fields are hidden from view for good reason, but now people think they know better? continued...