Reputation
Next privilege 250 Rep.
View close votes
Badges
5
Impact
~6k people reached

  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 5 votes cast
Apr
28
comment What are arguments against the usage of a ticker / marquee on websites?
when the amount of space you have is defined -- and unfortunately after 20 years of serious web development we're still having the argument whether or not the user's viewport constitutes a fixed space ;-)
Apr
5
comment Why do showers have “hot” and “cold” knobs rather than “temperature” and “quantity” knobs?
@usr: many sinks do have temp/strength controls on mixer taps ;-p That said, on taps typically it's not a thermostatic temperature control, the hot-cold axis actually controls the proportion of each water supply. My shower has a mechanical thermostatic temperature control, though.
Apr
3
comment Why do some websites (including Google) trim whitespaces in passwords?
@Mayo: "it cannot succumb to a dictionary attack" -- except, as is necessarily the case with any concrete example you actually give, this one can now succumb to a dictionary attack, or rather a corpus attack, since it's part of a corpus of text. Discussing passwords, no less ;-)
Apr
3
comment Why do some websites (including Google) trim whitespaces in passwords?
"thrown in some extra spaces to distort their observation" -- how does that work? If they observe and remember a sequence of key presses that successfully logs in, can't they later log in by repeating that sequence, regardless of whether some of the keypresses were insignificant? You might as well press the CTRL key a couple of times to "distort their observation". Chances are either they can watch you type or they can't, the space bar isn't going to blow their tiny mind ;-)
Feb
17
comment How can a retractable pen design be enhanced to discourage users from clicking the pen frequently?
... and so the design goal is not clear.
Feb
17
comment How can a retractable pen design be enhanced to discourage users from clicking the pen frequently?
@TimFitzGerald: I'm trying to highlight that in disagreeing with what the questioner says, "done for no reason", you've said that anything many people do must be "for some purpose". But the reasons people fidget despite that they know for a fact their habit makes others less productive because it's so irritating, is not necessarily a "purpose" so much as a "compulsion" (and the need to stop people doing it can be compulsive too). Your example of autistic self-stimulation is strong though, since it points to the possibility there's a genuine conflict of interest rather than just a bad habit.
Feb
17
comment How can a retractable pen design be enhanced to discourage users from clicking the pen frequently?
" It isn't possible, unfortunately, to prevent rapid clickers from buying the cheapest loudest retractable pens on the market", well, if "the company pen" is silent but some of your colleagues deliberately go out to purchase something louder instead, then it's a lot easier to make the case that their choices are callously anti-social. Which might be the goal here. So perhaps you can "prevent" them doing that in the same sense they're prevented from bringing their drumkit to work.
Feb
17
comment How can a retractable pen design be enhanced to discourage users from clicking the pen frequently?
"if so many people are doing it (this writer included) it must serve some purpose to them." -- although perhaps only in the same sense that fingernail-biting, alcoholism, and failing to find the right control in a bad UI, "serve some purpose" to the many people who do them ;-)
Jan
10
answered How to ensure users can't sign up for multiple accounts?
Jan
10
comment Save buttons that don't save
What happens in your preferred design if you click "Close" before the auto-background-save has completed? Is what it does actually "block-until-saved-and-then-close", or is it "close-right-now-but-the-thing-doing-the-saving-will-stay-in-the-background-and-‌​eventually-complete"? The former is arguably a good idea since it means nothing out of sight is still making changes with no means any more to indicate an error. And it just about arguably can be called "save and close", if it's possible that slow I/O means there's still some saving to do. It can indicate when that's done or failed.
Jan
6
comment Is there a more effective way to convince users to sign up with their social media accounts?
Mind you, if your service does the kinds of things they're concerned about on Facebook, then pushing them away from your service is perfect for them. If the only reason they're on Facebook is because everyone they know is on it, and they don't actually want to share user profile info with as many websites as possible, then warning them that your site is not for them would be an excellent service to potential users ;-)
Dec
6
comment Is it OK to autocorrect users when they have mistyped parts of their email address?
And .co is a public suffix, meaning that you should be prepared for more or less anything immediately under it. In contrast for example .il is not (currently) a public suffix, so if someone claims their email address is "steve@jessop.il" then it'd be a surprise. Still not impossible, though. They might be a domain registrar, and anyway the public suffix list isn't a perfect description of what domains are available to register. Of course you can check your own records to see whether .co is rare enough compared with .com among your users to justify an extra confirmation.
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
1
comment Is an in-app email function useful to users?
"Which user experience is preferable - emailing from your day to day email client, or doing it in some random application that you have to log into?" -- seems an intentionally loaded question designed to solicit a particular response. You could have loaded it the other way: "which UX is preferable, sending a message to another user immediately, or somehow finding their email address and firing up a separate email client?"
Aug
23
comment Does the Oxford Comma increase readability?
@JonofAllTrades: the discussion as to what's "correct" or "incorrect" probably isn't a UX issue, although that's not to say English would necessarily want it :-) I'd have thought that copy readability is a UX issue, though.
Aug
22
comment Does the Oxford Comma increase readability?
I think the remark on punctuation is just mistaken. In the sentence ("Yes," she said, "I do.") the punctuation can go inside the quotes, fair enough. In the sentence: (A "selfie", as the youngsters call it, is a photo of yourself) it can't, although you could use italics instead to avoid the issue. When listing labels in quotes there should be nothing in the quotes other than the exact label text. I used parentheses to quote my examples there because I really don't think that nesting different types of quotation marks would improve clarity in this case!
Aug
22
comment Does the Oxford Comma increase readability?
@David: I wonder what proportion of questions on the site could reasonably be answered, "if it made much difference, you wouldn't even be considering two different ways to do it, everyone would already be doing the one that was significantly better. Just pick either of them and get on with your life." ;-)
Aug
8
comment Are italics on the web bad for accessibility?
At risk of flogging an old horse, you could in any case use <em> and <strong> for emphasis on the web. If someone has difficulty with italics, that's supposed to be what browser settings (for example local !important style rules) empower them to deal with. That said, if the client "doesn't want italics" that probably means they don't want <em>. Explaining to them that those with accessibility issues can in theory turn off the italics that the client sees using some obscure browser settings, that may or may not be familiar to that user, probably doesn't wash ;-)
Jul
11
comment Show not implemented functionalities to tease the user
In some organizations, if the user is outside the organization and unsupervised then it's by definition not an alpha. Even if it's a really half-assed beta, any external release is beyond the alpha-testing stage. That said, the use of the terms "alpha" and "beta" is pretty idiosyncratic. I don't think you can really assume anything about the meaning of either term other than, "we know it has at least some problems".
Jun
23
comment Why don’t we remove door handles and let doors open both ways (inwards, outwards)?
Next question: once you have designated an "in" door and an "out" door, why not just build the "in" door to only open inwards?