15,896 reputation
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bio website jon-walmsley.com
location England, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 2 hours ago

Working in UX / Information Architect role in Hampshire, UK.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/UXJon


Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: Well, screenreaders are built to read standards. Standards come about because a certain implementation has a significant uptake already. As new techniques evolve and get used they may eventually become standards too. However, by the time things end up as W3C standards they may very well have been surpassed 'in the wild' by newer techniques.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: That may all change soon now that WAI-ARIA has become part of W3C Recommendations
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: Screenreaders are also used to navigate sites, not just read them. For instance pressing H to jump from header to header. Just reading out everything in a linear fashion is not what users really want. (When you visually read a site do you read everything? Logo, navigation item etc on every page? No, you jump to where you actually want to start reading. Same with visually-impaired users with screenreaders). I'd be surprised if new systems that just read everything are that popular.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: Things like NVDA (open source screen reader) are the same. They read out any of your content; word documents, notepad, OS windows as well as web browsers. With web browsers they read out the markup, not what is visually shown on screen. Things like that and Mac OS VoiceOver are invaluable during testing, and don't cost anything to install and use.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@Gusdor: Well just build using agreed web standards. Screenreaders don't need any special treatment, just follow w3c standards and screenreaders should just read them accordingly. There is also the Web Contents Accessibility Guidelines for more accessibility-specific advice. But in general; follow standards and mark up your content correctly.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@Gusdor: Yes, they totally should be blind-friendly. Blind users will access sites through things like screenreaders, but those screenreaders will only read out the content on the site. If your content is just a picture of something then screenreader users won't be able to understand it. So yes, it is sort of up to the browser, but the browser can only display content in the way it was actually written and structured. If you build a site badly then a browser will display it badly, and same goes for screenreaders.
Apr
9
comment How can I ask users just one question?
@Franchesca: Thanks, but I didn't really give an answer to his question, I just gave a different way of thinking of the issue itself. If it's a business requirement that this question exists then my comment isn't really much use there.
Apr
9
comment How can I ask users just one question?
You'll never get a high degree of confidence with a question on a website like this. Regardless of how you word it or display it it's up to the visitor to interact with it as they see fit - ignore, click first button they see, close whole tab... Also, you may only get people who feel strongly in one particular way answering (so you end up with 90% of people who answer it clicking No, even though that's just 1% of the actual audience). Your best bet is to use internal analytics to find out. Did they spend x time on the page? Did they go elsewhere afterwards? Use real data to determine site use.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@SlaKrop: Exactly. Colour can be used as an enhancement to the information. But colour itself isn't the information.
Apr
9
revised Colourblindness in design
edited tags
Apr
9
answered Colourblindness in design
Apr
9
comment How should an error message explain to users that they input the wrong URI scheme?
How does the system know it's invalid? Does it follow the link to see what gets returned, or is it purely validation of the text that is entered?
Apr
8
reviewed Close What is the most common user interface in the world?
Apr
8
comment Do long domain names really affect user experience?
Yup, all true. Case in point - I still get annoyed and misspell it when I type ux.stackexchange, and I've been using this site forever!
Apr
7
comment close button for item details page
Firstly, where did the manager get the assumption from that 'dummy users won't know about the browser's "Back" button and will simply get stuck in the item-details page'? And secondly; where did s/he get the assumption from that a Close button will remove this problem? That's two big assumptions, with the second being an assumption based on an assumption. That's too many assumptions deep.
Apr
7
revised close button for item details page
deleted 22 characters in body
Apr
7
comment Tabbed (swipable) AND drop-downs mobile UX
I think you're trying to do too much on one screen. You don't need to do everything from one place. Lead the user down a journey; give them one decision to make at a time instead of all of them.
Apr
7
revised Tabbed (swipable) AND drop-downs mobile UX
formatting.
Apr
7
comment How to test icons with users?
General usability testing should work, no? Give users some tasks "Create a new enquiry" that sort of thing, and see if they use the icons to do that.
Apr
6
comment Best practice for form layouts?
Why is multi column better for regular users?