15,817 reputation
84587
bio website jon-walmsley.com
location England, United Kingdom
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 1 hour ago

Working in UX / Information Architect role in Hampshire, UK.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/UXJon


Apr
11
reviewed Close Is there any software or web service that helps with the creation of Personas?
Apr
11
comment Auto agreement to the ToS by clicking “Sign Up” button in sign up form
@Pdxd: No, that's dark patterns that you're referring to. Tricking people into making decisions. Good UX is not even making that a possibility in the first place.
Apr
11
comment Design of changing entities
Closed this question at OPs request.
Apr
11
comment Auto agreement to the ToS by clicking “Sign Up” button in sign up form
This is more of a legal issue really. From a UX point of view not having to click a checkbox is preferable to having to do so, but that option isn't presented there for the users benefit, purely to fulfill legal obligations. What do the legal team there need to happen?
Apr
10
comment Dropdown menu or radio buttons to represent choice
Checkboxes don't allow you to make only a single choice. You can select multiple (or none) items. What you refer to would be Radio buttons (but you have checkboxes in the mockup design there).
Apr
10
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
Let's hope that Jensen Jay Alexander Bikey Carlisle Duff Elliott Fox Iwelumo Marney Mears Paterson Thompson Wallace Preston doesn't need to sign up!
Apr
10
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
@CharlesWesley: Yes, but these are all implementation issues. From a pure UX perspective the moment you set a limit you're imposing a theoretical restriction on certain people using the system. Whether anyone actually meets that restriction is a different matter. Although with names people are free to be named anything.
Apr
10
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
@CodeMaverick: Well yes, and an INT only allows integers. But you wouldn't use that as a data type for a persons name. The type of data being taken should lead what data type is used to store it, not the other way around.
Apr
10
comment Hover states on tables with striping
You say there's no dynamic behaviour, but are they clickable? So can you click them to perform an action on an items (edit etc)?
Apr
10
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
I'm not offended, just wanted to see some reasoning. You make some valid points actually, but they're mostly related to display usernames, not users actual names.
Apr
10
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
None of this really says why you'd set these limits. What does 'short enough to keep your site sane' mean? What are the 'implementation' issues that would necessitate character limits? (and that's more of an implementation issue that you're transferring onto the user rather than dealing with it technically). I also disagree with restricting special characters. Again, why do this? There will be people with á, ' or & in their name. And certainly with brackets (). Also how does having a limit 'guide him/her by restricting to an upper limit' work? What are you guiding? And why?
Apr
10
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
None. No limits at all, upper or lower. If you set a limit then there will be people who can't add their details correctly. What is your reason for wanting to put limits on there? Worth a read is the classic post falsehoods programmers believe about names
Apr
10
awarded  website-design
Apr
9
comment Has anyone used a hamburger style left nav in a web application (not a website)?
The question should really be should you use a hamburger menu in an app. I'm sure others have already, but that doesn't mean it's been successful or well received.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: Well, screenreaders are built to read standards. Standards come about because a certain implementation has a significant uptake already. As new techniques evolve and get used they may eventually become standards too. However, by the time things end up as W3C standards they may very well have been surpassed 'in the wild' by newer techniques.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: That may all change soon now that WAI-ARIA has become part of W3C Recommendations
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: Screenreaders are also used to navigate sites, not just read them. For instance pressing H to jump from header to header. Just reading out everything in a linear fashion is not what users really want. (When you visually read a site do you read everything? Logo, navigation item etc on every page? No, you jump to where you actually want to start reading. Same with visually-impaired users with screenreaders). I'd be surprised if new systems that just read everything are that popular.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@DavidMulder: Things like NVDA (open source screen reader) are the same. They read out any of your content; word documents, notepad, OS windows as well as web browsers. With web browsers they read out the markup, not what is visually shown on screen. Things like that and Mac OS VoiceOver are invaluable during testing, and don't cost anything to install and use.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@Gusdor: Well just build using agreed web standards. Screenreaders don't need any special treatment, just follow w3c standards and screenreaders should just read them accordingly. There is also the Web Contents Accessibility Guidelines for more accessibility-specific advice. But in general; follow standards and mark up your content correctly.
Apr
9
comment Colourblindness in design
@Gusdor: Yes, they totally should be blind-friendly. Blind users will access sites through things like screenreaders, but those screenreaders will only read out the content on the site. If your content is just a picture of something then screenreader users won't be able to understand it. So yes, it is sort of up to the browser, but the browser can only display content in the way it was actually written and structured. If you build a site badly then a browser will display it badly, and same goes for screenreaders.