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visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Apr 28 at 22:45

Feb
17
awarded  Yearling
Dec
25
awarded  Guru
May
8
awarded  Good Answer
Feb
17
awarded  Yearling
Oct
5
comment What's the point in asking the user to do what an application can do itself?
My comment was directed at "My own guess is some kind of legacy system which Microsoft cannot change without extensive work." As far as I'm aware the only logical reason to ever shorten passwords is for usability on mobile devices; you prevent people from screwing themselves over typing.
Oct
5
comment What's the point in asking the user to do what an application can do itself?
If you have password in plaintext and wish to switch to something that's actually sane, you simply add a salt column and then hash the users password. You can even do this lazily by keeping the column blank and filling it ( + hashing) the next time the system checks it. If you have a hash already but it's insecure, you can also simply add a flag column then hash it on demand, since when the user attempts to login you'll have their password and can compute the secured version.
Oct
5
comment What's the point in asking the user to do what an application can do itself?
What conflicts with md5 hashing?
Jun
29
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
17
awarded  Yearling
Mar
8
answered Which symbols to show availability status for online gaming ?
Mar
5
answered Is it better to put the action in the href or in an onclick event?
Mar
1
comment Is a “repeat password” field necessary in a signup page?
All of you are gracefully missing the point! The re-type your password field is for the peace of mind of your users; not yours. People are insecure when typing their passwords in a registration form (even when it's one they've used before). Yes, they can go though the (troublesome) re-cover your password field (even if it's right after registration), however if you have any common sense you'll know many of your users don't want that; and will go though a test of patience before realizing the problem, -if- they realize the problem at all. Rule #1: your users are not as "smart" as you.
Feb
22
awarded  Commentator
Feb
22
comment Should I use a banner-like or logo-like header in this website I'm designing? (based on aestetics and ui-design principles)
Bad example; the banner one is not necessarily bad in principle, it's just bad there (as in badly designed). Also, how exactly is it a logo? the inconsistency between the two would suggest that's not an official logo, otherwise it should have been present in the banner.
Feb
22
answered Progressive images = Better user experience?
Feb
21
comment Completely redesign a website every so often? Good or bad?
redesign only to fix usability issues, or just make things better. Re-style for that fresh (and modern) look every so often; and little things can make a world of difference. This won't have much of a effect on the users unless you have a fairly large core user base. Typically (for them) style is always good, but re-design can be met with tar and feathers even when it's obviously for the best. Anyway, this question does not have a straight up answer; it depends on too many factors.
Feb
21
comment “css-tricks.com” is to “good css blog” as “_______” is to “good ui blog”
useit.com/alertbox
Feb
21
revised friendly version of date formats
deleted 15 characters in body
Feb
21
revised friendly version of date formats
added 3 characters in body; added 23 characters in body