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1d
awarded  Nice Answer
2d
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
Now that I think about it, I want to draw a distinction between having good affordances and having good ergonomics. Having a good affordance means it appears possible to physically interact with an object the way it’s meant to. Doesn’t mean it’s easy or even it’s necessarily the first thing you try. Having good ergonomics means it’s easy to physically interact the way it’s meant to. Whether it appears physically possible or not is a different matter. A door knob and handle have the same affordance, but the door handle has better ergonomics.
2d
revised Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
Don't confuse with ergonomic.
2d
answered Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
Apr
15
awarded  Generalist
Apr
13
answered What makes a form field mandatory?
Apr
6
revised Correlation between number of colors used and brain processing?
update link
Apr
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
18
comment Is there a common practice for cases of very delayed responses?
Ideally, you'd communicate the approximate time to run the process before the users even start it --that may impact whether they want to start it at that moment or not. If that's not technically feasible, the next best thing is to provide an approximation immediately or shortly after it starts. A progress bar can do that, although a reasonably accurate "time remaining" countdown is better. Badging and notifications can indicate when the user can return to the window when it's fully occluded. I don't know how or if they can be used for a web app in a browser.
Mar
18
revised Is there a common practice for cases of very delayed responses?
Some advantages made explicit.
Mar
16
answered Is there a common practice for cases of very delayed responses?
Mar
12
comment View vs Modify “mode”
@Tohster: Good point on the mouse. Even if the user were using the keyboard for data modification (e.g., a text box), s/he probably needs to switch to the mouse anyway to carry out the viewing task even if there weren't a mode (e.g., to use scroll bar). And, yes, all these numbers are pretty rough approximations, so the framework only helps if the costs grossly outweigh the benefits, or vice versa.
Mar
11
comment View vs Modify “mode”
@Tohster. Check if you included mentally preparing –time for the user to think, “I need to change this, which I do by first going into Modify mode with that button.” Using Kiera’s times (given in Wikipedia), activating a button = 1.2 sec to mentally prepare + 1.1 sec to point the mouse + 0.10 sec click the mouse = 2.4 seconds. I kicked it up to 2.5 guessing that about 25% of the time the user also has to move from keyboard to mouse (0.4 sec). Using Card, Moran, and Newell’s values yields 2.75 sec per click (YMMV).
Mar
11
revised View vs Modify “mode”
typos
Mar
11
revised View vs Modify “mode”
typos
Mar
11
answered View vs Modify “mode”
Feb
26
comment Innovative search filter design needed
What performance problem does the current wireframe have? If you can articulate why it "should not be usual as check box,drop downs, radio buttons," then we'd know which way to go. Maybe you'd know too.
Feb
26
revised How to highlight best elements corresponding to a search without changing their order
Better label/name
Feb
25
answered How to highlight best elements corresponding to a search without changing their order