154 reputation
5
bio website
location Wisconsin
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Jul 23 at 23:18

My programming experience includes:

  • Java (High school AP exam in 2003 - far from an expert)
  • Embedded C (college robotics and embedded systems courses)
  • Matlab (did lots of numerical analysis and system design back in college)
  • VB (very minimal)
  • MUMPS (Caché Object Script - the only language I've coded professionally. Go ahead, make jokes!)

The things I love doing:

  • riding bicycles
  • building bicycles
  • indoor rock climbing
  • making bulleted lists

Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
3
awarded  Commentator
Jul
3
comment Combo Box/Dropdown control that allows new values
the level of effort involved in choosing depends on the number of options in the list. If there are 3 items in the list, you might be right; it takes minimal effort to select, but if there are 20,000 items in the list, you need to sift through a lot of junk to see if the one you're looking for is there, so it will be easier to just type it. Also, it depends whether your users are mouse people or keyboard people (or if it's a mobile app, finger people).
Jul
3
comment Combo Box/Dropdown control that allows new values
One thing to watch out for is if you are allowing users to add new options that will then be saved to the list for future use, you might end up with a list that has Cheeseburger, Cheesburgers, and Cheeseburgerz.
Jul
3
comment Combo Box/Dropdown control that allows new values
If I'm not mistaken, this is where "combo-box" got it's name; it's a combo of a list box and a text box. You can select from available options like a list box or you can type something new like a text box. If you're kickin it olde skool and coding some VB, it was one of the intrinsic controls msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa242120%28v=vs.60%29.aspx but I think it's more common practice to have an "other" option in your list and then a separate comments text box that becomes active/required when you choose the "other" option.
Apr
9
awarded  Critic
Mar
21
comment What is the best way to represent the difficulty level in a children's game?
@Seraphim'shost Yes, I'm suggesting that a method which avoids the "oh wow that last one looks best/strongest! I want to be her" psychology might make it less likely that the user would select an inappropriate difficulty level in the first place.
Mar
20
comment What kind of design do users like the most at the time of this question, 'Flat' or 'Skeuomorphic'?
Although I think this is a great answer, I don't think that it is the whole answer, as the move from shiny and round (intentionally avoiding the term "skeuomorphic") to flatter and more square isn't limited to what we view on screen. Just look at the physical design of the last few iPhone iterations. The 3 had rounded edges and a polished back, the 4 had square edges with a smooth glass back, and now, the 5 has square edges with a brushed metal back.
Mar
20
comment What to call “Cancel” when “Cancel” is already the default action?
If RedBox's "Just Kidding" button is too playful for the context of your application, you could easily replace it with "Go Back."
Mar
19
comment Should “Like us on Facebook” be a required field on a form?
Thanks for contributing an answer to User Experience - Stack Exchange! •Please be sure to answer the question. Provide details and share your research! But avoid … •Asking for help, clarification, or responding to other answers. •Making statements based on opinion; back them up with references or personal experience. If you have to start your answer with "In my opinion," then it's not an answer at all within these guidelines.
Mar
18
comment What is the best way to represent the difficulty level in a children's game?
I'm just not sure what 5-yr-old wants to play a game full of text. I'm not saying that this is a good thing, but just a relavant observation, I've seen children play computer games without adult help (see NickJr.com) before they can speak a complete sentence, let alone read the word "Advanced."
Mar
18
comment What is the best way to represent the difficulty level in a children's game?
This is sort of like the byki.com flashcard program (it's a free download if you want to take a look). If you get the first question correct, it adds some new more difficult questions into the rotation. If you get it wrong, it repeats the same question until you get it correct. It's a kind of automated difficulty level. Along that same vein, there is another piece of language learning software called duolingo which approaches it a bit differently. The more difficult level is unlocked when you complete an easier one or you can take a test at any level which unlocks all earlier levels.
Mar
18
comment What is the best way to represent the difficulty level in a children's game?
@Seraphim's host I would be afraid that after the first time they play and they lose, they would just leave the game all together instead of switching difficulty levels. Attention spans are getting shorter every day.
Mar
18
awarded  Supporter
Mar
12
answered Icons vs. Dropdown for primary mobile navigation
Mar
11
awarded  Teacher
Mar
11
answered What is the best way to represent the difficulty level in a children's game?