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Feb
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
5
accepted Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
Nov
6
awarded  Autobiographer
Oct
27
revised Would having people vote on the outcomes of multivariate tests keep people interested in UX?
Changing the title to better describe the contents of the question
Oct
27
suggested approved edit on Would having people vote on the outcomes of multivariate tests keep people interested in UX?
Oct
7
awarded  Quorum
Oct
5
accepted Should a web-based non-modal dialog prevent users from leaving it via keyboard access?
Oct
4
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
@JeromeR Convincing management to change this would be difficult, and gathering data and performing usability studies will take time (especially since I am a developer and this is usually not my job). I'd like to find an immediate solution that makes accessibility as good as it can be, while later preparing to challenge the requirement.
Oct
2
revised Should a web-based non-modal dialog prevent users from leaving it via keyboard access?
added 25 characters in body
Oct
2
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
I believe the thought behind this was that sometimes users will want to be able to see what is available in a non-modal dialog while interacting with elements on the main page. For the symbol picker, that would mean being reminded that there are certain characters available. Perhaps we could express this through some way besides a non-modal dialog, but that isn't an option at this time.
Oct
2
revised Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
added 20 characters in body
Oct
2
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
It's web, but I appreciate you providing information for both. However, I'm a bit confused about your web example. Are you saying that the user cannot tab to return focus to the main window, as you can on desktop? Also, do you have any sources to back this up?
Oct
2
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
It would be good to rewrite the answer to focus on that part then. I've created a new question to address whether or not you should be able to tab out of a non-modal dialog.
Oct
2
asked Should a web-based non-modal dialog prevent users from leaving it via keyboard access?
Oct
2
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
I think there's a misunderstanding. The user is allowed to get out of the dialog and tab-navigate to other elements. No locking them in, and no closing the dialog if they click outside or close it. This is a business requirement we cannot change (besides, I think there are a lot of valid use cases where it can happen). I'm interested to know where focus shoudl go if the user tabs back to the initial open button and activates it.
Oct
2
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
So assuming that the user was permitted to leave the dialog, what is the proper behavior if the user goes back to the button that opens up the dialog. Focus goes back to the dialog as it did when it was first opened?
Oct
2
comment Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
This situation is about a non-modal dialog, not a modal dialog. A user can leave the window with a mouse. If they can't leave by tabbing, wouldn't that mean it's non-modal for mouse users and modal for keyboard users? That's not what we want.
Oct
2
asked Where should keyboard focus be after activating a button that brings up a non-modal dialog?
Sep
21
comment Are there user behavioral differences on a platform with a 1,000 users vs. 100,000+ users?
This is an excellent post, but it would be even better if it could link to external research. We wouldn't want people to think that you just made up convincing-sounding arguments.
Sep
9
comment Design problem: Tying together two related but different elements when one is potentially below the fold
Any chance you'll still be able to add a wireframe?