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2h
revised What's the best way to set the hair dryer?
added 123 characters in body
2h
answered Showing items in a list with limited space
3h
comment Showing items in a list with limited space
@MichaelLai Whitespace is not the same as wasted space. In a cramped UI, a little whitespace can be very valuable. I can certainly imagine that a screen would look a little messier with a scroll bar there. The designer is in good company, since Apple decided years ago to also hide their scrollbars this way.
3h
answered What's the best way to set the hair dryer?
3h
comment Does it make sense to authenticate a user when he/she provides existing valid credentials while registering?
@Bobson, it should be noted that this makes more sense when you use an existing account from another provider (Google, Facbook, etc) to register. In that case registering and logging in are more or less the same action.
3h
comment The coding monkey dilemma
@PariyaKashfi That's true, but the tools of UX (user stories, personas, wire frames) give everybody a voice, regardless of which aspect of the product they're responsible for. They allow us to address the concerns of the developer, the security guy, the accountant, etc. and work together towards an elegant and creative solution. The person with final authority should not be making decisions, but facilitating, creating consensus. Good UX requires everybody to come together, so UX is often more about facilitating well than about designing well.
3h
comment The coding monkey dilemma
@Okavango I'm not against specific roles. What I'm saying is that everybody needs to be present at the table, and there needs to be a constructive discussion in a common language. Co-design is not about everybody doing design work, it's about everybody contributing meaningfully from their own perspective to the design of all aspects of the product. (Also, I would caution against designing your workflow from the principle of accountability. If your starting principle is "who do we blame if this thing blows up?", you've lost the battle for a positive design process at the first hurdle.)
1d
answered The coding monkey dilemma
May
11
comment Why do inflight wifi networks display a captcha?
Because bots are for doing things many times. Like leaving spam messages on forums, or upvoting videos. These things could be done manually, but they would be tedious. Logging in to the plane wifi is not something you're going to do hundreds of times, since you only have a handful of devices on you anyway.
May
6
comment Best way to communicate “tap anywhere to continue”
I suggest offering a more meaningful choice. I would guess that 90% of users at this point will either want to play a new game or quit. They don't need a button to quit, so offer them a big button for a new game and a small button for returning to the game's menu.
May
5
revised Do websites still have to support Internet Explorer 8 and below?
I've attempted to strike a balance between my original language and that of the editor. The edits changed the meaning of the post. That 's a problem because it's already been voted on in its original form. By all means fix typos, but don't move the post away from the original intention.
Feb
21
awarded  Yearling
Jan
29
reviewed Approve Distinction between saving and exporting
Jan
28
comment What is the reason arrows are interpreted as direction?
@DA01 I'm not saying you're wrong, but I don't think the provenance is as well established as you suggest. On top of that, if the native american pictograph were not originally designed as direction indicators, but only took on that meaning later, can we really say that the original meaning of "arrow" is the answer to the question? Birds and stones can fly through the air, but their symbols didn't end up signifying direction. The full answer should consider the shape of the symbol. (To be fair, I expect it has more to do with affordance than with perspective).
Jan
28
comment What is the reason arrows are interpreted as direction?
I really like the point about affordance. Consider this: once you associate an arrow with direction, there's really only one direction it can indicate. Use it the other way around, and it's a very vague and ambiguous indicator. This may not be why the original 'designers' drew it that way, but it's a clue as to why it worked.
Jan
28
comment What is the reason arrows are interpreted as direction?
This question actually has two interpretations: what was the original designer thinking about, and what makes it such an effective symbol. It may well be that the original reference was to an arrow, but it worked, because of biases in our visual cortex, or the affordance of the shape itself.
Jan
28
comment What is the reason arrows are interpreted as direction?
@DA01 I must concede that Okavango's answer shows that this shape was drawn to refer to a hunting arrow (and native American stone arrows did have barbs). But the symbol was not used to indicate direction. I'm not saying that my hypothesis must be true, but I don't consider it disproven by the fact that native American used pictograms based on arrows. We'd need to find the earliest known occurrence of an arrow indicating direction to have more information.
Jan
28
comment What is the reason arrows are interpreted as direction?
@DA01 Ancient arrows looked more like teardrops than converging lines. You need some pretty advanced metallurgy to create those to thin barbs and actually make them strong enough. I'm not saying ancient humans were referencing something. I'm saying converging lines are a depth cue, which is why our brain associates them with direction, which is why the arrow symbol works. In this view, the symbol wasn't really consciously designed: it emerged because it works.
Jan
15
comment When is it appropriate to ask User confirmation?
@pattern86 Even in that case, the fact that you created a confirmation button gives you a false sense that you solved the problem. People can still push the button out of habit. A better solution would be to use a molly-guard to prevent accidental button presses, and a time delay between the button press and the activation of the rocket, to allow for a cheap undo. The system should also clearly communicate the change of state once the button is pressed (ie. start a big red countdown).
Jan
13
awarded  Caucus