30 reputation
5
bio website
location Seattle, WA
age 28
visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen Mar 10 at 17:47

I am a relatively new web-designer at a company that creates websites that provide students with information and statistics about colleges. I have become more and more interested in UX design, and I love to discuss ideas/projects/problems/solutions.


Mar
10
awarded  Editor
Mar
10
accepted Pinch/Zoom: evidence for bad UX
Mar
10
revised Pinch/Zoom: evidence for bad UX
deleted 15 characters in body
Mar
7
awarded  Supporter
Mar
7
comment Pinch/Zoom: evidence for bad UX
For me personally it's a no brainer. in 5 years mobile device saturation will be so high that this whole debate will be moot. But if we're not an ecommerce site, where mobile optimization has clear ROI benefits, the debate just comes down to personal choice and bandwidth. My CEO just doesn't think the pinch and zoom is that bad of an experience, or its not bad enough to warrant all the extra time needed to make a site mobile-optimized.
Mar
7
comment Pinch/Zoom: evidence for bad UX
Our corporate website is thus more of a marketing outlet. This is our identity and what we are about. Will not just a well designed desktop app suffice (once again, devils advocate here)? Furthermore, look at other data analytics companies: Tableau, Simply measured, Moz, etc. None of them have mobile sites or mobile-optimized sites. This further complicates the business case.
Mar
7
comment Pinch/Zoom: evidence for bad UX
Thank you, this is a very in-depth response. The problem I'm running into is making a strong enough cost benefit analysis to my CEO. To play devil's advocate, our main product is a data analytics web app (desktop). For mobile users we have a mobile app. Currently, only 5% of our website visitors are mobile. So the question is really--should we be devoting the design/dev bandwidth to building a mobile app or would that bandwidth be better allocated toward product improvement?
Mar
7
asked Pinch/Zoom: evidence for bad UX
Jan
17
awarded  Scholar
Jan
17
accepted Drop down menu best practice question
Jan
17
awarded  Analytical
Jan
17
comment Drop down menu best practice question
Indeed, that is good to keep in mind. Sometimes it's hard to get out of "designer" mode.
Jan
17
comment Drop down menu best practice question
Yeah, your second paragraph is the approach we decided to go with. Thanks for the suggestion in your last paragraph, that is quite a good idea.
Jan
17
comment Drop down menu best practice question
Yes, that is the type of dropdown I'm talking about. Essentially, I was wondering whether it's better to have a table where the dropdown width doesn't encroach on adjacent columns, with a dropdown that truncates its contents when selected (In your example it would look like "Heating, Ventilation and air..."), OR a dropdown that takes up as much horizontal space as needed and encroaches on it's neighboring columns. In the end we decided to go with the former option.
Jan
17
comment Drop down menu best practice question
Thanks for sharing this, I discussed it with some of my teammates and dev and we won't be implementing it unfortunately, but I'm definitely going to give it a try other projects
Jan
10
awarded  Student
Jan
10
asked Drop down menu best practice question