213 reputation
14
bio website thepointless.com
location Wisconsin
age
visits member for 1 year, 5 months
seen Mar 14 at 20:45

Web/Application developer.

Proficient in HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, MySQL, Application Architecture, Application and Database Optimization.

Capable in VB, C#, .NET, and administering Linux, Windows Server, IIS, Apache, and MySQL.

Owner and Sole Contributor at http://www.svidgen.com and http://www.thepointless.com

Web Systems Developer at the Rowland Reading Foundation

Husband and father of 4.

Catholic.


Nov
8
awarded  Yearling
Dec
13
answered Should printed graphics of a domain start with www, uppercase/lowercase? How to make the user understand that it's a domain?
Nov
19
comment Threaded messaging, simplicity
LetCan you articulate why this feels messy and confusing to you?
Nov
14
comment Finding out how users respond to look and feel
I would actually clarify one point: If a user is presented with 2 to 4 UI options, I'd find benefit in asking users which of the options they'd be drawn to, as well as which options, if any, are an assault on their eyes. But even here, I think we want to avoid asking users to describe or rate an interface using any subjective terms or metrics that likely mean different things to different users.
Nov
14
comment Finding out how users respond to look and feel
Sure. But, I would still insist that the worst option for determining how users feels is to ask them. It's an option, to be sure; but it is not a good option if you expect the input to yield a meaningful change in design. The design the users feel the "best" about is the one that entices them to use it, even if this enticement occurs on a non-conscious level (it does).
Nov
13
comment Finding out how users respond to look and feel
And it very well may be, for a particular application, that the "prettier" interface is better, given the audience and/or purpose of the application. I tend to think fewer clicks are better, so I'll often cite Google as the penultimate UI/UX example. But, in some applications, a less efficient path through a prettier or "happier" interface evokes a better [emotional] response. We simply can't determine that with any accuracy by actually asking the users.
Nov
13
awarded  Commentator
Nov
13
comment Finding out how users respond to look and feel
Oh, I don't disagree at all that the user's emotional response is relevant. The point is simply that the user's impression of their emotions (feeling and summation thereof) is unimportant. This is particularly true when the user is biased by a question or asked to give feedback in a particular format. The best measure of a "good" emotional response is a high rate of goal-completion, which includes enticement.
Nov
13
answered Finding out how users respond to look and feel
Nov
9
awarded  Critic
Nov
9
comment Can we just use tooltip on some rather than on all controls?
No. Take the example of successful sites, like this one. Hover over the edit link on an answer, or the add comment link (not the button, which is a distinctly different type of control). As moronically obvious as these actions are, they have non-patronizing tooltips. And as stated in my comment on Dan Barack's, if a good number of controls of type X have a tooltip, be consistent. The Add Comment buttons need no tip. They're buttons: used across the site for form submission, requiring no further explanation.
Nov
9
comment How to display dynamic labels
I'll point out one more little detail from Gmail's contact management screen (as well as many other edit-on-the-fly UI's): Once the edit is complete, the edited value "turns back into" a normal, "non-editable" HTML-type element, like a DIV, SPAN, or LABEL. So, it returns to having the appearance of a normal label after the edit.
Nov
9
comment How to display dynamic labels
Ohh, ok. So, "top labels" is referring to labels that just sit directly above their associated input box? If that's the case, I think this still works. The drop-down and edit fields are only visible during field-name customization.
Nov
9
comment Can we just use tooltip on some rather than on all controls?
Good answer. But, I'd also add that some controls, because of their design, may be "uglified" by the addition of the little question mark. In such cases, I'd recommend putting a tooltip on all controls of that type to present consistent behavior, even if the "tip" is trivial.
Nov
9
comment How to display dynamic labels
@AnnaRouben, bear in mind, when you first arrive at the form the label has a default value, email in this case. After selecting one of the variant labels, the field is still recognized as an email address. And hover effects still refer to it as an Email.
Nov
9
comment How to display dynamic labels
I'm struggling a little to understand your concern. When you say "top labels" are you referring to static labels that appear at the top of the form? Or potentially dynamic -- but default -- labels that appear at the top? Or something else entirely?
Nov
9
answered How to display dynamic labels
Nov
9
awarded  Supporter
Nov
9
comment Conveying keyword connection to user
Yes. Clicking a tag on the left or typing one in followed by a comma causes associated tags to appear.
Nov
9
comment Conveying keyword connection to user
Ok. But, many sites do entail spontaneous tagging. Namely bookmarking and sharing sites. Did you look at my two links?