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seen Aug 14 at 12:24

Aug
4
comment Can we Quantify Cognitive Load?
Cognitive load is one aspect of workload - a topic studied extensively by the human factors community. See this TOC and paper for examples for measures of primary or secondary task performance, subjective assessment, and physiological measures. See this example which is available to anybody with an eye tracker - and lots of time.
Jul
21
comment why are the names on sports jerseys in all caps
Tinker's research proposes one model of reading. It is not the only model nor is it the most recent research on the topic. For example, see this paper which argues for greater readability of upper case type.
Jul
21
comment why are the names on sports jerseys in all caps
See a very similar question in a different context.
May
28
comment UX Patterns for Multi-Monitor Thick Client Apps
Similar question?
May
28
comment Are there any examples of multi-screen or multi-device design patterns?
Similar question also without an answer.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 3 - Part 2: The point is this - the gamer has at least two types of manual tasks to perform: spatial, discrete. They require different resources which, fortunately, do not conflict and are best executed by different hands. The allocation of the tasks to the left and right hand represent an optimization of task performance based on the total workload in the dual-task scenario. There is more to the situation than I just described but this comment includes two ideas on where to learn more on this topic.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 3 - Part 1: Regarding ' it would not explain why most people prefer the right hand for countless other spacial tasks.' The difference between the use of the controller and 'countless other spacial tasks' is the difference between single-task and dual-task performance. Google 'Wickens, Multiple Resource Theory, dual task' or start with this paper.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 2: Regarding 'most people grow up using left handed controllers and therefore it becomes natural to them'. (1) Most people of a certain age have grown up with 2-handed controllers with the joystick operated by the left thumb. There are many gamers older than those controllers and did not grow up using the left hand. (2) 'natural' implies sufficient training overcomes design flaws of a controller violating the s-r-c principle. True. With enough training most behavior becomes natural. I do not think it explains the designer's choice to put the tracking control under the left thumb.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 1: Regarding 'stimulus response association is built not innate'. (1) stimulus-response-compatibility is not the same as 'stimulus response association' (to me at least). (2) Many interactions with technology, e.g., a traffic light, are learned. However, Gibson's concept of affordances suggests some interactions with our built environment do not require learning. (3) A broad statement 'stimulus response association is built not innate' sounds like behaviorism. This was a dominant school of psychology decades ago. Not so much today.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
@r-j-hode The stimulus-response-compatibility principle does address learned response but also addresses stimulus-response-compatibility that is inherent in the way the brain works. See this book for an overview. Stopping a car in response to a red traffic light is learned response. This is not an example of stimulus-response-compatibility as I use the term in the comment above.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Potential factors involved might be: preference based on handedness, absence of a secondary task, and absence of training. Right-handed people will perform a manual task with the right hand in the absence of a secondary task, e.g., controlling the 6 buttons on the right side of a gaming controller. The default choice of the right hand in the single-task joystick situation is habit/preference. The default choice in a single-task situation for pressing 6 buttons is, likely, the right hand. However, putting both in a dual-task situation results in the gaming controllers we see today.
May
22
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
The right hemisphere of your brain is responsible for spatial tasks - mostly. The right hemisphere controls left hand movement - mostly. Having the left hand control movement through space in a game takes advantage of the stimulus-response-compatibility principle - which is based on hemispheric differences in information processing.
Apr
28
comment Is there a UX practitioner's code of conduct/ethics guide?
Anybody running usability tests with participants other than coworkers should be familiar with guidelines like those in Section 8. Sadly, your coworkers sign away many of the rights mentioned in Section 8 when they become employees of a company.
Apr
28
comment Maximum number of Color-Codes
Ummm...No. I've never read any empirical research supporting this answer. Please Google 'color naming' 'color coding' 'human factors' for a start. You will find research suggesting the number is higher than 5 - probably somewhere around 10. Look at any of the US DoD HCI guidelines, maritime HCI guidelines, aviation HCI guidelines, medical HCI guidelines, etc. You will find recommended colors for color coding. There are always more than 5 colors. All of those colors were selected based on empirical research using human performance as a criterion for selecting the colors.
Apr
28
comment Software to run pairwise comparison testing?
I do not have any experience with commercially available software. However, whichever you choose, make sure you check to see whether they support the reduction of the number of possible comparisons from the total set to the subset needed to separate the items in the list. There are analytical/methodological techniques for reducing the number of comparisons any one person has to make while retaining the ability to rank all items in the list by combining everybody's data.
Apr
15
comment How does the visual size of a text input field affect users' expectation of how much they should write?
Research on survey design has been looking at this type of problem for a while. Social Science Computer Review is full of research on the effect of input widgets on response rate and quality. This is an example that is not behind the pay wall. In the context of online surveys, field size does affect the response. It can change the response format (see Couper 2001 in SSCR). It can depress response rate.
Apr
11
comment Should a user be informed if their Do Not Track request is honoured?
I'm assuming that '...honours the DNT requests...' means the visitor has set the browser to 'do not track.' Clarifying because the DNT can be set to 'track me.' If a site honors DNT then each session for the same visitor would trigger a "not tracking you" message. Right? Also, a 'site' is many servers. Not all are directly under the site's control. All servers will decide whether to honor the DNT request. This makes a single message from a site potentially meaningless because some servers will honor the request while others will not.
Apr
10
comment When is using haptic feedback for button presses a good idea?
Haptics in mobile devices is complex. Are you asking about haptics in specific applications like IM, games, or accessibility?
Apr
8
comment research: dark or light UI better outside
This model of daylight readability assumes negative contrast polarity will degrade readability. See page 24. This research on legibility manipulated several factors including contrast polarity. They summarize the effect of the color-related factors as 'Color difference was found to play a minor role in legibility under daylight ambient conditions.' I do not have access to the full paper and am unable to provide more details about the effect of contrast polarity in detail.
Feb
21
comment Thermostat UIs make me guess and think too hard
There is research on thermostat usability and mental models. See Kempton.Me‌​ier.Peffer.Sachs.