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Sep
6
comment Comparison of charts: side-by-side vs. top-to-bottom
As Aryan Vijay implies below, the answer to your question depends on the type of chart, the data, and the type of comparison. Can you be more specific about any of these three factors? Also, search for 'trellis chart', 'scatterplot matrix', or 'small multiples' to see standard ways of arranging charts for comparison across charts.
Sep
3
comment Which way should a dial turn using the arrow keys?
You are working on a problem known in human factors as a 'population stereotype'. There are several principles involved. See this slide deck for a summary. As with any population stereotype, the definition of 'population' affects the expected movement of the dial in response to the control affecting the dial. On UX Stack Exchange, you are likely to get people saying 'clockwise' and others saying 'counter/anti clockwise.' Ignore all of them. Implement both methods and test it with prospective users.
Aug
28
comment Desktop metaphor - Why is it called “windows”?
While Microsoft's Windows may have popularized the term, the creators of Smalltalk used 'window' to describe...umm...a window several years before Microsoft's first release of Windows. Search for 'window' in this Smalltalk 72 user's guide. Most likely, they were influenced by NLS which had windows.
Aug
23
comment How much value does Human factor's CUA certification hold for a Senior web developer?
This question has been asked in different forms previously. Search for CUA and take a look at the top questions.
Aug
21
comment Is email field assistance still necessary?
Are you asking whether client-side validation should check that the email field entry's format is local-part@domain or are you asking whether the standard practice of requiring entry of the email address twice is still necessary? Both are forms of client-side validation but serve different purposes. The first validates data format. The second validates the user's intent, i.e., to provide an authentic or bogus email address.
Aug
21
comment Designing a password/authentication system usable for young children in a classroom
It looks like a version of Correct Horse Battery Staple. See XKCD and this discussion for some insight into this 4-part password.
Aug
21
comment Changing a visual object as it is dragged
Do you mean something like this or like a video editing UI? With the difference being the map holds the objects rather than a list or table.
Aug
20
revised Looking for independent usability study of the Microsoft Fluent UI
In the question, changed 'conducted' to 'published' because Microsoft has conducted proper usability studies of the Fluent UI but they have not published them.
Aug
20
comment Examples of online help for hands-on physical hardware components rather than software?
YouTube seems to be the place where many companies put installation/usage instructions for hardware. Examples: Crutchfield's electronics How-To‌​, Lowes water heater installation, Dewalt mitre saw operation
Aug
20
comment Looking for independent usability study of the Microsoft Fluent UI
Perhaps no study has been published because there is little practical application of the results of a study. (1)Microsoft does its own research. External research would not influence them. (2)Companies adopting the Ribbon for their own products can rely on the 'people are familiar with it' rationale because (3)Office products are taught in school thereby providing a trained population of Ribbon lovers (4)The Ribbon is not applicable to mobile design and less applicable to web app/site design-Office 365 excluded. Both mobile and web app/site design are where most design work resides today.
Aug
20
suggested suggested edit on Looking for independent usability study of the Microsoft Fluent UI
Aug
14
comment Speed and accuracy of text entry methods on smart phones?
I've never seen research on Swype. However, comparisons of text entry on mobile devices have been around as long as there have been mobile devices. Check out this paper as a starting point for pulling the thread on this research. MacKenzie has been in this field for years. Check the references in his papers to find other papers you should read.
Aug
14
comment Graphic representation of various data types
Having worked on this problem, I agree with Renat's statement: "it is really hard to invent clear and easy to understand icons" for data types. This is why I voted for this answer. The only potential problem with Alexey's solution is that the letters may change if the UI is localized. At that point, the letters may not be unique across the data types.
Jul
29
answered How does the projection-angle of road arrows change drivers' expectations of the appropriate speed in a curve?
Jul
29
comment How does the projection-angle of road arrows change drivers' expectations of the appropriate speed in a curve?
Part III Google 'pavement marking' legibility OR readability and you will find detailed research reports on this topic along with guidelines like the one referenced in the previous comment.
Jul
29
comment How does the projection-angle of road arrows change drivers' expectations of the appropriate speed in a curve?
Part II The pavement marking research results have been codified into guidelines for pavement marking. For example, see section 22.2 in this document. The word SLOW appears in two sizes. The size depends on the speed limit of the road on which the marking appears.
Jul
29
comment How does the projection-angle of road arrows change drivers' expectations of the appropriate speed in a curve?
Part I There are many factors affecting pavement marking legibility and the effect of the marking on driver behavior: vehicle speed, time of day, type of road, type of intersection, driver characteristics, paint type, pavement type, purpose of the marking, color of the paint, etc. A summary of some of TTI's research on this topic.
Jul
17
comment Confusions about applying Hick-Hyman Law in user interface design
This paper provides a nice overview of Hicks-Hyman - much better than Wikipedia. It illuminates Ekapros' answer about 'information gained.'
Jul
17
comment Confusions about applying Hick-Hyman Law in user interface design
Perhaps another UI example would be appropriate for this question. The situation in example 2 is a known exception to the Hick-Hyman law. Exceptions include tasks with a verbal response, a familiar stimulus with a single dominant name, and a large number of practice trials. Although the response in example 2 is manual rather than verbal, the stimulus (your home country) is familiar and you have had a large number of practice trials. See Longstreth et al. (1985) for more information on exceptions.
Jun
27
comment Why is the “Record” icon always round and usually red?
On the tape recorders like the one shown above, the red button was an indicator of the button's function but it was not the only aspect of the design for preventing accidental recording. You had to press Record and Play simultaneously to start recording. If you pressed Record only, the button would return to its regular position.