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seen Oct 18 at 1:05

Sep
29
suggested suggested edit on Truncated string usability
Sep
19
comment Original design choice of back and forward directions?
Here is evidence to support the claim that arrows point in the direction of tape movement. It is from 1954.
Sep
19
comment Original design choice of back and forward directions?
While reading an answer to this question, I saw the reference to Olsson. Is there any evidence that Olsson designed these controls? I've found nothing to support it.
Sep
19
comment What is the origin of the eject symbol?
Agree the symbol suggests movement. In the context of a cassette player, the horizontal line is the cassette and the arrow suggests movement of the cassette up, i.e., out of the play loop and into the hands of the operator.
Sep
19
comment What is the origin of the eject symbol?
In 1965, the line was above the triangle. See the left-most button on the Grundig C100
Sep
9
comment When to ask a user to take an action multiple times vs. batching it?
Time to execute the task may affect the decision to execute individually or in batch too. You can use a tool like CogTool to estimate task completion time for multiple actions and for batch execution.
Sep
9
comment When to ask a user to take an action multiple times vs. batching it?
This comment does not consider the 'follow' feature mentioned in the question. Instead, it deals with batch execution of a feature that (1) may take a long time to complete, and (2) may not complete succesfully. In that situation, you have to know: (1) whether unsuccessful completion of the action on one object in the list affects completion of the action against other objects in the list, (2) how to present problems encountered during batch execution, and (3) how the user will troubleshoot those problems.
Aug
14
answered Are 12000 dpi laser mice overpowered for the human wrist?
Aug
4
comment Can we Quantify Cognitive Load?
Cognitive load is one aspect of workload - a topic studied extensively by the human factors community. See this TOC and paper for examples for measures of primary or secondary task performance, subjective assessment, and physiological measures. See this example which is available to anybody with an eye tracker - and lots of time.
Jul
21
comment why are the names on sports jerseys in all caps
Tinker's research proposes one model of reading. It is not the only model nor is it the most recent research on the topic. For example, see this paper which argues for greater readability of upper case type.
Jul
21
comment why are the names on sports jerseys in all caps
See a very similar question in a different context.
May
28
comment UX Patterns for Multi-Monitor Thick Client Apps
Similar question?
May
28
comment Are there any examples of multi-screen or multi-device design patterns?
Similar question also without an answer.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 3 - Part 2: The point is this - the gamer has at least two types of manual tasks to perform: spatial, discrete. They require different resources which, fortunately, do not conflict and are best executed by different hands. The allocation of the tasks to the left and right hand represent an optimization of task performance based on the total workload in the dual-task scenario. There is more to the situation than I just described but this comment includes two ideas on where to learn more on this topic.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 3 - Part 1: Regarding ' it would not explain why most people prefer the right hand for countless other spacial tasks.' The difference between the use of the controller and 'countless other spacial tasks' is the difference between single-task and dual-task performance. Google 'Wickens, Multiple Resource Theory, dual task' or start with this paper.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 2: Regarding 'most people grow up using left handed controllers and therefore it becomes natural to them'. (1) Most people of a certain age have grown up with 2-handed controllers with the joystick operated by the left thumb. There are many gamers older than those controllers and did not grow up using the left hand. (2) 'natural' implies sufficient training overcomes design flaws of a controller violating the s-r-c principle. True. With enough training most behavior becomes natural. I do not think it explains the designer's choice to put the tracking control under the left thumb.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Comment 1: Regarding 'stimulus response association is built not innate'. (1) stimulus-response-compatibility is not the same as 'stimulus response association' (to me at least). (2) Many interactions with technology, e.g., a traffic light, are learned. However, Gibson's concept of affordances suggests some interactions with our built environment do not require learning. (3) A broad statement 'stimulus response association is built not innate' sounds like behaviorism. This was a dominant school of psychology decades ago. Not so much today.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
@r-j-hode The stimulus-response-compatibility principle does address learned response but also addresses stimulus-response-compatibility that is inherent in the way the brain works. See this book for an overview. Stopping a car in response to a red traffic light is learned response. This is not an example of stimulus-response-compatibility as I use the term in the comment above.
May
23
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
Potential factors involved might be: preference based on handedness, absence of a secondary task, and absence of training. Right-handed people will perform a manual task with the right hand in the absence of a secondary task, e.g., controlling the 6 buttons on the right side of a gaming controller. The default choice of the right hand in the single-task joystick situation is habit/preference. The default choice in a single-task situation for pressing 6 buttons is, likely, the right hand. However, putting both in a dual-task situation results in the gaming controllers we see today.
May
22
comment Why are most game controllers left handed?
The right hemisphere of your brain is responsible for spatial tasks - mostly. The right hemisphere controls left hand movement - mostly. Having the left hand control movement through space in a game takes advantage of the stimulus-response-compatibility principle - which is based on hemispheric differences in information processing.