659 reputation
126
bio website
location New York, United States
age 24
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Mar 14 at 23:15

Jun
28
comment Similar buttons for very different actions in Gmail
+1 I used to love Google's icons and I thought they were very skilled at creating legible icons, but ever since the recent redesign where they introduced these newest icons, I can't figure out any of them besides Reply, Reply All, and Delete.
Jun
28
comment What are your views on having a button that says “Don't click this button”?
Also, if you really like the misleading "Don't click me" over something more descriptive, I just thought of "Coming soon" - Technically the feature that will be accessible by that button is coming soon and it wouldn't seem like something clickable, except to the users who know that it is.
Dec
11
comment Messaging a user success and error messages at the same time
I may be misunderstanding the OP but that seems to be the whole point of the error message. The user performed an operation, parts of it failed, and they would want to know what failed. Other users shouldn't see this, but the requestor of the action would want to know.
Dec
11
comment Messaging a user success and error messages at the same time
I would argue that this solution actually requires the user to do more work. You would be forcing them to look through the list to find the ones with issues, rather than just listing them for the user to read easily. Even if they were all grouped together at the end of the list, the user would have to scan the whole list to figure out where these start and risk missing some. Maybe some clear highlighting would help. Also consider if there are a lot of columns in this table, then it would be more difficult to find the value that didn't load correctly.
Dec
11
comment Represent multiple routes on a google map
The good thing about plotting them all on the same graph is then they can compare the routes. If you think they don't need or want to compare them, then separate graphs would be fine, but don't put them on a timer unless you have a good reason to. Time is money and they don't want to wait for all of the routes to scroll by. Maybe you could give them filter options, like "Closest", "Shortest", "Longest", and "Preferred Locations" so they can only view routes they are interested in.
Dec
11
comment Represent multiple routes on a google map
ahh I think your previous comment answers my question. In this case, the interface becomes very easy as you can show his current location, highlight the starting point(s) that are closest to him, and show their destinations in a similar color (so he can judge how long they are, where they go, etc.), and show some sort of line or route between those points. Then, even though there are a lot of locations drawn on the same map, only a few are highlighted, like in the example I linked to.
Dec
11
comment Represent multiple routes on a google map
@Siddharth thanks for the clarification. Is he accepting each of the routes on his schedule for the whole day or just choosing his next route?
Dec
11
comment Slider alternative
How usable is something like this on a desktop application? The touch and hold action feels more smooth and natural on a mobile device, but I don't think I would have the same dexterity with releasing a mouse click.
Dec
7
comment large amount of data on a single page
I like the idea of user profiles to knock out some of the information that they need to enter. This would obviously depend on the content of the application, but (1) if there is user information that they enter in everytime, then it would help to save time entering this over and over, or (2) if there are several different profiles that would necessarily go together, then allowing them to select a profile would fill out the related information.
Nov
13
comment What makes a user think a webpage is 'broken'?
+1 Things happening too quickly is a really good one, and definitely a great example of a case where it was designed to work that quickly but can be perceived as broken even though nothing is really wrong. Many times, if pages seem to stop loading abruptly, I assume that something did not load correctly.
Nov
2
comment How to display a family tree in a horizontal timeline
@JohnPixle, why can't the first example be used but aligned with years? So replace where the image says "1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc." with "1970, 1971, 1972, etc." and align each person with the year they were born. (Unless you need to indicate the year they died as well - I don't have a suggestion for that.) Although generations may be staggered, a person would always appear after their parents, so they horizontal order would be maintained. Also, if this is displayed online, you could make use of tooltips that appear on hover.
Nov
1
comment Order of fields in contact forms
Great answer! Good design should guide the user naturally throughout the entire piece (application, site, brochure, manual, etc.) without requiring effort from the user. The order of form elements should follow this same rule. Filling out a form that flows naturally will make the user's effort seem minimal, as @Girish describes, and avoid that "Ugghhh more questions????" feeling that we have all experienced before.
Oct
31
comment Prompt user to edit an inline-edit field
Could you make use of a small "Edit" image button next to the text?
Oct
31
comment Prompt user to edit an inline-edit field
I think I could use a bit more context to be able to provide feeback: - Is this field required? - Could it be prefilled if a user had previous entered their name? - Could you make any use of a label, i.e. "Name:"? - Are there any other inputs that they need to fill at the same time?
Oct
31
comment Prompt user to edit an inline-edit field
+1 for a great reference!
Oct
28
comment Using hover-overs on the web when the goal is to allow rapid clicking
+1 for the email spam example. I think this illustrates the responsibilities the OP is trying to give to the user very nicely.