203 reputation
14
bio website onehandkeyboard.org
location Seattle
age
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Mar 4 at 21:42

Apr
19
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
@jwenting Again, that's you. I would probably do the same myself. But you shouldn't generalize what you would do to what the target customer of the wine site would do. See my answer below (-1 points! :) for an alternative view.
Sep
27
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
@AndroidHustle I don't necessarily think they should require an email address at the splash screen before even loading the site. That has worked well for many sites (Groupon, Gilt, Rue La La, etc.) but we would need to know more about the wine website before making that call. My answer serves more to offer a counterpoint to the argument that you (or at least most people here) are making: that getting a user's email address is somehow spammy/evil/worthless. If you haven't read the link I posted all the way through, I encourage you to.
Sep
27
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
@AndroidHustle There's nothing about the relationship that should be "forced". This wine shop would do very well, for example, by sending people a free 10-page Expert Wine Buying Guide in return for their email address. Their target customers (but probably not you or I) would gladly trade their email address for that. Then every week thereafter, sending a cheatsheet for buying Merlot, Cabernet, Chardonnay, etc. along with great deals on wine.
Sep
27
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
@AndroidHustle In the $300 Million Button story they were making it needlessly hard for people with cash in hand to give them money. That is of course a bad idea. But that's not really evidence that collecting an email address upfront (from people who are not, at that moment, throwing money at them) will result in less revenue. Groupon's implementation shows that it can be very profitable.
Sep
27
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
In the $300 Million Dollar Button story they are forcing people who have already clicked the "Take my money!" button to jump through needless hoops. Bad idea. But random visitors to the site are an entirely different story. 99% of them aren't going to buy a thing. Buying is based on trust. And one of the best ways to build trust (and remind people that your site exists) is through regular lifecycle emails to people who have given you their email address.
Sep
26
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
@JonW They're already at the website trying to read it and you're denying them the ability to do so by requesting an email that they will probably read. Statistically, a single person landing on your website is very unimportant. Only 1% of them (or whatever your conversion rate is) will actually result in a sale. That's why sites require email addresses to see content; getting an email address is far more valuable than one clickthrough with potential to buy. This is completely different than requiring a signup at the point of checkout, by the way. You shouldn't do that.
Sep
26
comment Is it good practice to force users to give us their email address before showing them our site?
@JonW The increased read rate is important, but it's the later half of the article you should read. Keeping prospects warm, building trust in the brand, educating them on wine, and selling directly to their inbox week after week rather than whenever the customer happens to land on their site. I assume this wine site is "groupon-like", because that's what everyone is building these days. Daily or weekly deals on wine. In that case especially, email lists will drive their revenue.