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Jul
23
comment Using an image for a website background, and implications of changing screen size
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is more about graphic design and implementation than it is about UX.
Jul
23
comment With 2 types of users: should I provide 2 separate forms or use the same one for both?
It depends on the form and the users.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
I do agree completely with your first paragraph edit, though. Good points!
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
@AditGupta the point is if the sample is only minimal web sites, then that's not data one can use to prove there's a trend one way or the other. In other words, the sample data set doesn't validate the statement about the trend not going away.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
Also note that, at least in terms of aesthetics, there is no 'dream spot'. Visual trends are always on a pendulum. The history of art shows many, many cycles going from ornate, to stripped down simplicity, back to ornate.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
As for the survey, that was a survey of minimalist interfaces, so I don't think you'd be able to spot any trend that would fall outside that particular category.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
That NN/g feels it has legibility problems isn't a sign that it, as a style, results in bad UX in general. That's merely one thing to watch out for.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
@Chris I disagree that that is the fault of any particular aesthetic. We could argue that all popular and trendy styles are a temptation to focus on style over substance (or in this case, style over usability).
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
...for example, I can render a calculator button in a UI to look 3D and have shadows and highlights, or I can render it as a flat rectangle. But both are skeuomorphic in that they are intended to represent a real calculator button and share the same interaction ("push the button")
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
I believe the question is based on a faulty premise. Whether a design is 'flat (and minimalistic)' or 'realistic (and detailed)' isn't necessarily a sign that it's a good or bad user experience. There are well designed flat interfaces and well designed realistic interfaces. And vice versa.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
Note that 'flat design' can still have 'depth'.
Jul
22
comment Flat design worsens UX. Could/should the pendulum swing the other way?
There is a common misconception that flat is somehow the 'opposite' of skeumorphic. This isn't the case. Whether an UI element is skeuomorphic or not is independent of whether it is visually styles as 'flat'.
Jul
22
comment What's the purpose of “This page is intentionally left blank” we see in books?
It's typically a legal holdover rather than strictly UX related.
Jul
22
comment What's the purpose of “This page is intentionally left blank” we see in books?
This talks about blank pages, but the question is asking about the statement "this page left intentionally blank" that is sometimes printed o them.
Jul
22
comment Are there 'UX Stories' in Agile?
that's the challenge with using spikes as a solution, though. It seems that most people agree that design spikes aren't supposed to be a regular part of the process...just a rare exception when needed.
Jul
22
comment Are there 'UX Stories' in Agile?
Spikes, to me, seem very much like a "oops, we forgot to accommodate UX in the first place". The biggest concern is when you see things like 'exception-not-the-rule' when referring to spikes. UX can't be the exception if the goal is to have a good user experience in the end.
Jul
21
comment What's the best way to highlight errors in an unconventional form?
It has to be asked: Why is a site that's supposedly designed for UXers using such an atypical form?
Jul
20
comment Why should our website be made handicap accessible?
(Of course, at least in the US, the primary monetary argument for building a ramp even after the fact is to avoid a costly lawsuit)
Jul
20
comment Why should our website be made handicap accessible?
@Graham athletic shoes need to be delivered. Parents with strollers shop for athletic shoes. Parents in wheelchairs may be buying shoes for their kids. I do agree ADDING a ramp is expensive--just like rewriting already completed code is expensive. That's why it's best to figure this stuff out on day one so there isn't huge cost issues down the road.
Jul
20
comment Is using Page's section scrolling good for UX?
@JitendraVyas sure. Like I said, if you have that much content, this isn't the right design.