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May
14
comment 'Fountain well' style of software development
It depends on what you mean by 'design'. In my book, development is design as much as UX is. You can't really develop something without also designing it--whether that's the developer or UX person or business lead or whoever. Ultimately, a prototype is a design. So, based on your last comment, I think you're actually referring to Agile. Get something built first then make it prettier as you go. (Also known as MVP: Minimal Viable Product)
May
14
comment 'Fountain well' style of software development
I don't quite know that I follow you, but I think you're talking about an MVP framework: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model%E2%80%93view%E2%80%93presenter In general, this is something developers and designers often lobby for...having distinct decoupling of UI from business logic. There are many ways to handle it technically. All that said, at the end of the day, there's still things that have to make sense logically between the UI and business logic, so it's not a magic bullet.
May
14
comment Intuitive colour pickers for non-expert users?
Apple's color picker is one I like--mainly because of the many many options and ways to pick a color it offers up.
May
14
comment Why are messages on the road printed in reverse?
@CodeMoose you are correct. Ultimately, it's a less-than-ideal situation to write multiple line messages on pavement. But it's the only practical way to read multiple lines when traveling at 60mph. A better approach is usually a sign, where you can have multiple lines of text easily readable from top to bottom.
May
14
comment Laptop + external monitor = virtual screen arrangement?
@EvilClosetMonkey it's like asking what the best desk is for people. It's going to be overwhelmingly a personal preference. If we had a specific task to evaluate, then maybe there'd be a configuration that would be a better default option, but there'd still be so much variance in preferences.
May
13
comment Are there any web presentation systems that does this?
For the type of audience I assume you may be targetting, I'd say a link to a live code example may make more sense. Otherwise, a simple video presentation would hit most of your features. Just keep it short.
May
13
comment Are there any web presentation systems that does this?
This doesn't appear to be a UX question but rather a production question.
May
13
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
@plainclothes I don't think we're in disagreement at all. Absolutely, forms should be minimal, clear, easy, etc. But even then, I can't think of a valid argument to ever disable a submit button.
May
13
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
@plainclothes I'm not against inline validation...but that in no way should be a reason to make the submit button inactive, either. And it's nota numb skull issue. People don't like filling out forms, period. Many will only fill out the absolute minimum and in a lot of forms (which I'd agree are often poorly designed) it's easy to miss a field or two that were required. The only way to know that is to make sure the submit button also triggers validation.
May
12
comment Do signs printed on the road offer a significant advantage for the user over signs on a post?
@jamesqf good points!
May
12
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
The catch with in-line validation is that it will only validate if the user interacts with the form element. So you can still end up with not completing a form and having a grayed out submit as well as not seeing the error that keeps it from being enabled. I'm all for inline validation, but I would still argue that you want that submit button to also act as the validation trigger.
May
12
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
It's where the form is written out as an actual sentence and the form fields are integrated right into the flow. It's like a mad-lib: lukew.com/ff/entry.asp?1007
May
12
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
That's an interesting solution. I don't think it's applicable widely but certainly an option in certain cases. Personally, I'd go a step further and instead of putting that in the button, make that the actual form.
May
12
comment Implementing a passphrase instead of a password
But, that said, there's a fuzzy line here that is often crossed in the name of trying to 'help users have secure passwords'. A lot of password restrictions actually ENCOURAGE weak passwords. If you insist my password have punctuation, a number, and a capital letter, people will just enter A1! or some common 'beat the automated checker' phrase--which can ultimately be a lot less secure than a long purely alpha-based phrase. So I strongly encourage minimal password requirements. (See also sites that turn autocomplete off on password fields...it can backfire)
May
12
comment Implementing a passphrase instead of a password
@SteveDL hence my suggestion for 'some minimum criteria' but it should be pointed out that that is still a user annoyance. You are correct in that it may very well help with security. And that's good, of course.
May
12
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
Why do you suggest this?
May
12
comment Should I show the “Save” button before the required state is achieved
Inactive buttons are incredibly annoying. There's no indication as to why they are inactive providing no way for the user to figure out how to activate it. I'd recommend avoiding disabled buttons whenever you can.
May
12
comment The Keikendo Maturity Model for developing an organization's UX capabilities
UX is not first-and-foremost about measuring. It's certainly a part of it, but to distill UX down to simply measuring data is to miss a big part of what UX is about.
May
12
comment Do signs printed on the road offer a significant advantage for the user over signs on a post?
@AlbertLang actually, in this case, the picture is worth one word: Snow. Sometimes one word is all you need. :)
May
12
comment Do signs printed on the road offer a significant advantage for the user over signs on a post?
@plainclothes just the labor involved with shutting down a lane likely exceeds the printing of a sign in terms of labor costs.