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Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
@PhillipW nailed it on the head. We're trying to answer a misconception here with more misconceptions. :)
Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
@tohster sometimes the correction is simply "but that's not true" which I don't think makes for good Q/A. IMHO. That said, the wikipedia link does not talk about a door knob. It talks about a knob...there are many better designed knobs than a door knob in terms of offering up affordance (such as a dial on an amp or radio tuner).
Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
(BTW, the downvote is for the lever knob statement. I think it's important to point out why they are common: they are mandated, and they are functionally superior in a lot of ways. That they offer better affordance isn't really a primary reason for it.)
Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
As I mentioned to the OP, I don't see any actual examples of a doorknob having an affordance to indicate twisting. I don't think it's actually used as an example much--namely because it's a bad example of affordance. Also, I'm not pooh poohing good or bad design or anything of the sort--but I do stand by my statement that a door knob doesn't need twisting affordance...it's a known feature learned by most humans for the past many hundreds of years.
Apr
23
comment Expected behavior of the Back button in a non sequential process?
This is a really simple question to ask in testing--which might be the best place to figure it out. Generically, I'd try to avoid using tabs in the first place in the middle of a stepped process.
Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the premise of the question isn't backed up with citations that corroborate it.
Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
Lever based knobs are common because they mandated for ADA purposes (and have other benefits as well)--but not due to any sort of 'better affordance'. There's no need for a door knob to have any affordance in the modern world as it's a learned UI now.
Apr
23
comment Why do we say that door knobs afford twisting?
Norman's example refers to a general knob such as a radio dial--not a door knob. Neither of the other references refer to a door knob. I think the question is flawed. We need to see an actual reference to assume your assumption is correct.
Apr
22
comment What is better for a professional News Feed… A star or thumbs up?
There's no 'best' answer. Both are fine. So are hearts. So are perhaps any other number of icons depending on the larger context of your UI and branding.
Apr
22
comment What is an average header height for mobile websites?
It depends on your site and your header, really. There is no one answer to this question.
Apr
22
comment What is better for a professional News Feed… A star or thumbs up?
Best for what?
Apr
22
comment Should a web-based UI rely on the browser back button?
Rely on? No. Account for? Absolutely.
Apr
22
comment Simple vs Childish
There is no rule of thumb. It's impossible to say if your icons are childish or not without seeing them and the context they are placed in. As for 'enterprise like'--that isn't necessarily something anyone should aim for. Lots of enterprise software has truly awful UX (cough Peoplesoft cough Sharepoint cough etc.)
Apr
22
comment Should smart watches be immersive?
This is mostly a matter of opinion. That said, I think your question is off-base on some assumptions. The UI on the Apple Watch is highly immersive when you want it to be, but it's "just a watch" when that's all you need it to be. I don't think Apple has any intention of you playing with the watch while you're jogging. Whether an app should be "immersive" or not is entirely dependent on context.
Apr
22
comment Make a table full of (text)data more appealing, both graphically as UX-wise
How to make data look nice is a really broad topic and tends to boil down to 'use standard design and typography principles' like balance, prioritization, white space, contrast, color, etc, etc. For laying out data, everyone should read Tufte's volumes on the topic: edwardtufte.com/tufte/books_be
Apr
22
comment Make a table full of (text)data more appealing, both graphically as UX-wise
Contrast is good. Too much contrast can be overwhelming, though.
Apr
21
comment Best way of displaying table data on ipad - grid vs list
The best way to display data depends entirely on the data. FWIW, focus on scanability. Both can be made easily scannable as well as difficult to scan. In other words, it's not so much table vs. list but how well each is designed and what particular data elements are the key to scanning.
Apr
21
comment What's the best practice for limiting text length in a field?
Yep. Twitter figured this out already for us. :)
Apr
21
comment Is there a notable correlation between UX and the granularity of gamification?
If you can, perhaps come back with one particular example. It might be easier to analyze things in a particular context. For example, the SE badges. What they have going for them is that they are mostly secondary to being able to use the site. Aside from a few key badges worth gaining (to edit and such), they're mostly there for those that really care about them, and for those that don't, it's no big deal. That's very different than say, your game example, where having to accomplish tasks step-by-step may be the very goal of the game and what makes it fun.
Apr
21
comment How do “We call you back!” buttons on websites make sense?
I should add...my statement is based on a call-back system where the customer has some say in when they want the call back (typically either 'ASAP' or based on a preferred time). If, on the other hand, this is a system where the company decides when to call you back, then I'd agree with your statement...though I'd argue that makes for a rather poor customer UX.