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I'm a software architect. Yeah, what do I do on a UX site, you may ask?

Software design - a nowadays largely forgotten discipline - is about making software which solve human problems. The difference between today's UX and yesterday's software design is that UX has to stop at the point where technology gets involved, while software design goes right to the point where the software is at the user's hand, and even further - covering development processes, testing, deployment, whatever needs to get that software working.

Whatever it takes to make people's life easier, to make people's life more effective, to make people work with less stress, through software.

I'm an architect with a focus on frontend, and a proficiency in web-languages and web architectures.

I worked as lead developer / software architect for startups and well-known companies, and when it was realized I'm not that bad at user interfaces, I worked as a UX designer for a well-known finnish company.

So, ask me if you have any questions on how it gets done: how do we solve problems for humans through software.


Feb
13
comment Is multi-layer ESCAPE expected?
Thank you very much Roger! The reason I didn't entirely drop this idea yet is how old clipper apps worked: when you were inside a kind of menu (drilldown-style interfaces were quite popular back then), multi-esc did mean stepping back one level in hierarchy by each press
Jan
26
comment When is tapping back out of a deep hierarchy in mobile apps too much?
I'd disagree: this is a form of backtracking. Video gamers mostly hate it. The usability tests UX Myth is talking about are for reaching the goal (forward, an unknown location), not about reseting system state, and it tells us to have as few "non-goal" states between as possible.I believe that reset should be achieveable within at most 10 seconds (cognitive task maximum) and without thinking (esp. without reading intermediate labels)
Dec
26
comment Thoughts on Customizing Javascript Confirm Dialog
@MattWolin: excuse me, but where does GMail do this? Apart from leaving the page with unfinished edits where it's actually a different mechanism (onunload rather than confirm)
Dec
26
comment What's wrong with this picture?
Just a quick note: UX is not about beauty (that's visual design, more for graphicdesign.stackexchange.com than this site). I've seen really easy-to-use systems which looked hideous. A good UX question in this case would be to ask "Is this really intuitive?" And the way to do it is to ask multiple people on what do they believe the icons do and how to use the application in general. Look at this for example: youtube.com/watch?v=9wQkLthhHKA
Jun
6
comment Why most websites don't use keyboard shortcuts?
I was a developer for 5 years and a development team lead for 6. I was talking about these UX issues a lot. Nowadays, there's a tendency that it's good style to include them, but for example, we had multiple screen resolutions 14 years ago, yet responsive design didn't catch ground until the last few years. It's not that it wasn't an issue: devs were ignorant. So no, I don't agree with the timebox defense and I never did. However, this is a matter of opinion and experience, the rest of the answer - shortcuts aren't handled well by browsers - stands I guess.
May
14
comment Hungriness chart - where to find?
Thx :) I already have a male and a female persona. However, I'm thinking about having a timeline chart of 24 hours, with "I'm literally starving" and "I can't even look at food" as edge cases for each. We'd likely serve main courses only after the effects of appetizers wore off a bit. I know this is a bit of "half-scientific", perhaps even pseudo-scientific, but that's the fun part, isn't it?:)
Apr
28
comment Progress bar that allows to understand both current and maximum values
Or Guitar Hero, for that matter.
Apr
27
comment Break up options in a drop down by scope
@norabora: I still think there's a wording issue, affecting the mental model. How about "Shut down Object"? or at least close down... Also, make sure you make some kind of feedback about it, like a "Closed" sign - I'm not a big fan of confirmation messages, but a shop closed sign in a cartoon or photo and a sure-you-want-to-do-this-yesno in a dialog might help...
Apr
24
comment When is Skeuomorphism appropriate in an iOS app?
See my old answer, perhaps that would help you: ux.stackexchange.com/questions/22093/… - takeaway: you can be skeuromorph only compared to devices and tools used in our present day.
Apr
22
comment Quick Booking UX/UI design
Oh, a grid is a good start: it shows that the creator (designer) knows and cares about alignment. Proximity is more important, that's true, alao that repetition should be considered, but it's a good start, compared to the forms I've seen designed.
Mar
26
comment Maximum set of stairs users are willing to climb before needing an elevator
@NicolasBarbulesco of course it is, but I felt that's obvious and left it out
Mar
26
comment Maximum set of stairs users are willing to climb before needing an elevator
@André: oh, my situation is easier... I have architect friends ;) truth to be said, they don't really test it afterwards. Part of the reason is, when it's a private house, it would feel odd to revisit it regularly. A second part is, that just like in IT, design and construction is done by different teams and it's hard for them to witness their design "ruined" every single time. I still recommend to read Christopher Alexander's works, like the way he designed the Eishin Campus (that's in 3rd part of Nature of Order I guess)
Mar
26
comment Maximum set of stairs users are willing to climb before needing an elevator
@André: let's not mix usability with accessibility. Being able to handle disabled people is an accessibility issue. Usability is - and always was - a key issue in architecture, from mundane things - height of a basin for handwashing - to overall design things, like height of floors. On a sidenote, I believe, living in a place is the original user experience design, you have to deal with so many things... For details on architectural usability, refer to Alexander's A Pattern Language / A Timeless Way of Building, a required textbook in some architectural schools.
Mar
13
comment Is this a Mapping or Visibility issue?
Affordance is when you don't know how to deal with a certain appliance: do you need to press it, to pull it or turn it? In case the trick is to pull one of these while it doesn't seem to be pullable (eg: no outer edge or texture to pull with), then yes, it's also an affordance issue. Mapping is when you don't know which lightswitch is for which light, as it's outlined in Norman's Design Of Everyday Things.
Mar
13
comment How to avoid hiding the region of interest with the finger?
Good question, do you plan to put anything there? :) Perhaps you could calculate the "angle of attack" from the first few movements of the finger...
Mar
11
comment How to improve this retro CLI web app ux?
hmm... it's one thing to be faithful to age, and another thing to be usable. The 80s style of working was - as AS/400 basically hardcoded later - "menu-form-menu" duality. compared to that, a command line interface of select it 1<enter> select pkg "mypkg"<enter> add ap "do the thing"<enter> might be better for advanced users, think of a UNIX userland. Perhaps a combined prompt + (text) GUI like in total commander could work? I've found old UNIX command-lines more comfortable for advanced users than 80s TUIs simh.trailing-edge.com/software.html
Feb
16
comment Advantages of integrating chat and messages
@Geraud.ch: the concept still isn't clean I guess at Facebook. Regarding SMS-style usage: SMS is a strange beast as it regards presence as ubiquitous, that is, an SMS user is like Schrödinger's cat, both available and not available at the same time. The "seen" solution is a good call. However, I guess you agree that you are surprised when you get a mail-like long writing to your phone this way and you take it a bit rude when someone answers a short line without greeting or signature to a mail. This is what this mix causes, and we were talking about mixing the two channels.
Dec
17
comment What is the best way to approach usability testing an intranet?
The question was about "best way to approach intranet usability testing" and my answer was that the best approach is an informal approach in this case. This is an opinion, based on personal experience and professional agreement, shared between the users I've worked with, the client of that particular project, and some UXers I've spoken about the issue and had similar projects already - it's not a fact however, you're correct
Dec
17
comment What is the best way to approach usability testing an intranet?
@Andrew: I don't agree in general that formal usability testing in formal environments brings better results. I do agree that formal methods are important, as a checklist on what should be looked for. Yet I also believe a formal setting has a research bias: you have to watch your users in an as informal environment as possible. Early stress tests with blood pressure/pulse meters were unreliable, as it made people uncomfortable. So I opt for a more informal, friendly "interface" towards the user when doing the testing, rather than making sure everything is lab-clean - reality isn't.
Dec
17
comment Are increase and decrease arrows redundant on scrollbars?
@Henry: no, I guess she does scrolling on a vertical way, but never uses sliding controls, like, sidewise scroll ("swipe") to go to a different menu, or sliding locks, etc.