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seen Jul 21 at 23:40

I'm a software architect. Yeah, what do I do on a UX site, you may ask?

Software design - a nowadays largely forgotten discipline - is about making software which solve human problems. The difference between today's UX and yesterday's software design is that UX has to stop at the point where technology gets involved, while software design goes right to the point where the software is at the user's hand, and even further - covering development processes, testing, deployment, whatever needs to get that software working.

Whatever it takes to make people's life easier, to make people's life more effective, to make people work with less stress, through software.

I'm an architect with a focus on frontend, and a proficiency in web-languages and web architectures.

I worked as lead developer / software architect for startups and well-known companies, and when it was realized I'm not that bad at user interfaces, I worked as a UX designer for a well-known finnish company.

So, ask me if you have any questions on how it gets done: how do we solve problems for humans through software.


Apr
27
answered UX for a system that converts between units of weight and volume
Apr
25
answered Is it useful keeping “foveal vision” in mind when arranging content?
Apr
24
comment When is Skeuomorphism appropriate in an iOS app?
See my old answer, perhaps that would help you: ux.stackexchange.com/questions/22093/… - takeaway: you can be skeuromorph only compared to devices and tools used in our present day.
Apr
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
22
answered How to present weighted values
Apr
22
answered Alerting visitors to a website of a current event (e.g. breaking news)
Apr
22
comment Quick Booking UX/UI design
Oh, a grid is a good start: it shows that the creator (designer) knows and cares about alignment. Proximity is more important, that's true, alao that repetition should be considered, but it's a good start, compared to the forms I've seen designed.
Apr
22
answered Quick Booking UX/UI design
Mar
26
comment Maximum set of stairs users are willing to climb before needing an elevator
@NicolasBarbulesco of course it is, but I felt that's obvious and left it out
Mar
26
comment Maximum set of stairs users are willing to climb before needing an elevator
@André: oh, my situation is easier... I have architect friends ;) truth to be said, they don't really test it afterwards. Part of the reason is, when it's a private house, it would feel odd to revisit it regularly. A second part is, that just like in IT, design and construction is done by different teams and it's hard for them to witness their design "ruined" every single time. I still recommend to read Christopher Alexander's works, like the way he designed the Eishin Campus (that's in 3rd part of Nature of Order I guess)
Mar
26
comment Maximum set of stairs users are willing to climb before needing an elevator
@André: let's not mix usability with accessibility. Being able to handle disabled people is an accessibility issue. Usability is - and always was - a key issue in architecture, from mundane things - height of a basin for handwashing - to overall design things, like height of floors. On a sidenote, I believe, living in a place is the original user experience design, you have to deal with so many things... For details on architectural usability, refer to Alexander's A Pattern Language / A Timeless Way of Building, a required textbook in some architectural schools.
Mar
13
comment Is this a Mapping or Visibility issue?
Affordance is when you don't know how to deal with a certain appliance: do you need to press it, to pull it or turn it? In case the trick is to pull one of these while it doesn't seem to be pullable (eg: no outer edge or texture to pull with), then yes, it's also an affordance issue. Mapping is when you don't know which lightswitch is for which light, as it's outlined in Norman's Design Of Everyday Things.
Mar
13
comment How to avoid hiding the region of interest with the finger?
Good question, do you plan to put anything there? :) Perhaps you could calculate the "angle of attack" from the first few movements of the finger...
Mar
12
answered How to avoid hiding the region of interest with the finger?
Mar
12
answered Is this a Mapping or Visibility issue?
Mar
11
comment How to improve this retro CLI web app ux?
hmm... it's one thing to be faithful to age, and another thing to be usable. The 80s style of working was - as AS/400 basically hardcoded later - "menu-form-menu" duality. compared to that, a command line interface of select it 1<enter> select pkg "mypkg"<enter> add ap "do the thing"<enter> might be better for advanced users, think of a UNIX userland. Perhaps a combined prompt + (text) GUI like in total commander could work? I've found old UNIX command-lines more comfortable for advanced users than 80s TUIs simh.trailing-edge.com/software.html
Mar
8
answered How to improve this retro CLI web app ux?
Mar
8
answered Wizard UI / Sequence Map. Skipping a step
Feb
16
comment Advantages of integrating chat and messages
@Geraud.ch: the concept still isn't clean I guess at Facebook. Regarding SMS-style usage: SMS is a strange beast as it regards presence as ubiquitous, that is, an SMS user is like Schrödinger's cat, both available and not available at the same time. The "seen" solution is a good call. However, I guess you agree that you are surprised when you get a mail-like long writing to your phone this way and you take it a bit rude when someone answers a short line without greeting or signature to a mail. This is what this mix causes, and we were talking about mixing the two channels.
Jan
20
answered What are the Best Practices for Server Side Tabs?