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I'm a software architect. Yeah, what do I do on a UX site, you may ask?

Software design - a nowadays largely forgotten discipline - is about making software which solve human problems. The difference between today's UX and yesterday's software design is that UX has to stop at the point where technology gets involved, while software design goes right to the point where the software is at the user's hand, and even further - covering development processes, testing, deployment, whatever needs to get that software working.

Whatever it takes to make people's life easier, to make people's life more effective, to make people work with less stress, through software.

I'm an architect with a focus on frontend, and a proficiency in web-languages and web architectures.

I worked as lead developer / software architect for startups and well-known companies, and when it was realized I'm not that bad at user interfaces, I worked as a UX designer for a well-known finnish company.

So, ask me if you have any questions on how it gets done: how do we solve problems for humans through software.


Aug
3
comment Re-thinking “hover” functionality with touchscreens in mind
Yeah, I wanted this approach too, until I realized that Safari for iOS always handles this action and never lets the website code handle long-press events - or at least, not with the methods I tried it with.
Aug
3
comment Designing forms for iPad
Albeit this has absolutely nothing to do with UX, if you want to "fill" your whitespace and you seriously think that an iPad's screen is "big", perhaps you should read Wikipedia about whitespace and learn that fingers are quite inprecise pointing devices, therefore everything clickable has to be big
Aug
2
answered What is a suitable interface for exploring big images?
Aug
1
comment Do we have a taxonomy of UX requirements for software products?
It's a self-made categorization for a single talk, but software is about serving human problems by the use of computers; computers are logical, consistent, and above all, mathemathical, while humans are... human, they're "psychological". This link was considered as a pretty good start as IT engineers learn half of specification stuff, just not the other half :)
Aug
1
comment Root Node design for a hierarchy/treeview in the user interface
Ext.JS which I use uses a "hidden rootnode" feature. I guess most tree widgets have this feature. The reason behind is mathematical,so it's exposed system design if you wish.
Aug
1
answered Do we have a taxonomy of UX requirements for software products?
Aug
1
comment Do we have a taxonomy of UX requirements for software products?
Go to your nearest library, BL (British Library) has the full repository of ISO standards, they even bring it to you inside UK as I remember, although that has usually a high fee in order to encourage buying from original publisher.
Aug
1
answered Touch control of value with high range
Aug
1
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
And I remember a test - albeit this is a bit 'anecdotal', as I can't just refer to some papers, sorry - where they tested how little children are able to handle iPad's homescreen. It turns out, it was more of spatial memory, than icons: it was the position which mattered. But again, no, I'm not saying that icons don't have a place but I guess that our personal preference and relation to swiss design might alter the argument for both of us. Icons, are great, but as I'm using OSX, I concentrate on the color of the minimize button rather than its icon. But again, it might be a personalpreference
Aug
1
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
@VitalyMijiritsky: that's called metro UI, and will be installed by default on your next laptop - sorry for being sarcastic. Actually MS invested a lot of A/B testing into this now, it's also strange to me as right today I'm testing outlook.com, but I wouldn't entirely rule this out yet. But I didn't say that icons are ALWAYS worse; I said MOSTLY. This is what the research of MS shows, we might not agree, it might not be as aesthetically pleasing, but this is what it came out in tests. And my latest design (not user-tested yet) included "collapse" and "expand" for panel buttons, no icons
Aug
1
revised How to display ranges in a map legend
added 629 characters in body
Aug
1
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
@VitalyMijiritsky: With all respect, I disagree. It is a scientific fact that when you choose between icons and labels, labels win on an A/B testing (and that even a good icon is rarely better than a word). There are papers about this, there are reproducible experiments about this, so, it's science. As for the myth, perhaps I wasn't too careful in my wording, but the request for icons based on "a picture is worth a thousand words" is still an issue which needs to be elaborated with nearly every customer. As long as A/B tests show that icons fit you better in your situation, use them :)
Aug
1
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
@AndroidHustle: actually, there's a label right underneath it which clarifies its use ;) let's not get into the history of writing, and I didn't claim all pictures are bad. I just "summarized" results of A/B testings and what widely respected books wrote in the colliquial style so many people think of UX still. I'm sorry if you feel my summary of Raskin's writing hurts your feelings.
Aug
1
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
@VitalyMijiritsky: Actually, not. Refer to Chapter 6.3 of Jeff Raskin's book ( bit.ly/NTCrCz ) where he cites studies conducted by Mayhem, et al, or do an A/B testing, or visit large e-commerce sites, like Expedia. Count the number of icons without explicit, non-hover labels next to them, where it actually matters in revenue. It's surprising that the myth of the icon still lives through after debunked 20 years ago
Jul
31
comment What is the UI/UX term for in-view content “jumping” up/down due to changes out of view?
I don't know how it's called but I remember I connected two G accounts I never ever wanted accidentally, when between my mental command for "click" and the actual click an image has finished downloading, triggering a reflow, and also the reposition of a close button to a "connect this account to " or some other such button.There's no undo... I guess it should be part of the UX curriculum: always make your container sizes independent of rendering progress.
Jul
31
comment Graphically displaying a conversation between more than two people
you mean, like a forum I guess for the latter? - the former one reminds me of the talk / ytalk era (which I loved, as typing speed and rhythm is really personal, it brings a touch, but it was insanely inadequate to keep conversation flow esp. with more than 3 people
Jul
31
comment Graphically displaying a conversation between more than two people
esp. if you did this on the spot, it's brilliant. I always tell people, color is the third dimension (eg. heatmaps, if timelapse isn't an optio n), but you also realized, that modern messaging apps in fact dedicate (overlapping) columns to the participants, of which you could both unite. That said, the only thing remaining is an icon and a nickname, which, given the arbitrary alignment, shall be inside or right next to the message bubble as opposed to the edge of the screen.
Jul
31
comment HTML5 form element implementation inconsistency: chalk it up to progressive enhancement?
@msanford: wanted to write "my users' experience" originally, then I was lazy to fix, shall I edit?;)
Jul
31
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
As for electronic maps, I've not found anything useful even in the British Library, there is a book from the 90s but that doesn't even deal with tilemaps... I always bugged Astrid (the designer of Nokia maps) that we should simply write one :) (I even started its base...)
Jul
31
comment How to display ranges in a map legend
I guess it is, I mean, less than 50 mm is up until 49.99999 I guess, and 100 mm isn't between 50 and 100, it's between 100 and 500. Or you could say, "at least 50 but less than 100", if it's clear