4,834 reputation
1427
bio website bucketsoft.com
location Colorado Springs, CO
age 31
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

My company sites...

BucketSoft.com
Web performance optimization.

SilverlightXAP.com
Royalty-free Silverlight controls and XAML illustrations submitted by developers and designers.

RegexHero.net
Powerful and easy to use .NET regex tester built in Silverlight.

My personal sites...

swortham.blogspot.com
My personal blog (mostly programming stuff).

GLdomain.com
My OpenGL site. Most of the programs and tutorials are outdated by today's standards, but I suppose it could still be useful to someone.

060calculator.com
Calculate how fast your car will reach 60 mph from a standstill.


May
13
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
This is fine but at some point a returning user may like to change their password to something they'll remember. And then we face the same problem for the change password dialog. Do we force the user to type their new password twice, or just once?
May
13
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
@BenBrocka - I agree, if you're typing fast it's hard to see every letter as you type it. But I do like how it solves certain problems without requiring the user to read and follow additional instructions, or toggle any options.
May
13
comment Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
@webvitaly - Yeah, I liked that approach as well. I can definitely see pros and cons of each.
May
13
revised Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
added 157 characters in body
May
13
revised Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
added 27 characters in body
May
13
answered Why should we ask the password twice during registration?
May
9
answered How to display a faceted-search menu where categories could contain just 1 or over 100 choices?
May
9
comment Yes/No radio buttons: Vertical or horizontal
@JimmyBreck-McKye - The decision becomes harder at that point. I could see that becoming a good reason to make everything vertically aligned. But I've worked on multi-page forms where the Yes/No questions compose the overwhelming majority of the radio button based questions. So I'll still arrange them horizontally, and the few questions with 3 or more options might be vertically aligned. If spacing is used correctly, then this inconsistency won't necessarily be a problem. Everything can still be clear to the user.
May
8
answered Yes/No radio buttons: Vertical or horizontal
May
8
comment Yes/No radio buttons: Vertical or horizontal
In general what I've found is that if you're dealing with enough options that you're going to have a problem with wrapping you should absolutely use a vertical layout as you say. But in the case of a simple Yes/No response, I prefer the options to be horizontal and aligned from question to question.
May
8
comment Yes/No radio buttons: Vertical or horizontal
I agree. I've created hundreds of Yes/No questions for insurance applications and this is the conclusion I came up with as well. The only difference is that in my case I position the radio buttons to the right of the question. But either way works well.
May
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Mar
31
revised A Web Enabled Desktop App
added 7 characters in body
Mar
31
revised A Web Enabled Desktop App
added 12 characters in body
Mar
31
revised A Web Enabled Desktop App
added 12 characters in body
Mar
31
answered A Web Enabled Desktop App
Mar
30
comment Is the asterisk the common symbol to mark fields as required in all languages?
I gave up asterisks after realizing that it's more effective to denote the exception rather than the rule as described here... ux.stackexchange.com/questions/840/…
Mar
16
comment Should aspects such as page render time or time taken to retrieve results be considered part of UX?
@DA01 - Read the whole article and you'll see that he has numbers from 50,000 websites. And sure, server side performance and scalability should not be overlooked. But you should measure to determine how much of a problem it is before spending too much time there.
Mar
16
comment Should aspects such as page render time or time taken to retrieve results be considered part of UX?
Granted, some of these front-end optimizations require server configuration. For example, setting far-future expiration dates, using gzip, etc. But these are still things related to the static files (images, js, css) that make up the majority of requests on your site. Ideally these things should be on a CDN... but you get the idea. These are the things the user spends the most time waiting for (in most cases).
Mar
16
comment Should aspects such as page render time or time taken to retrieve results be considered part of UX?
@DA01 - I made up that 90% figure, but in reality it's probably higher when looking through Steve Souders' research. The actual quote from Steve Souders is, "80-90% of the end-user response time is spent on the frontend. Start there." stevesouders.com/blog/2012/02/10/the-performance-golden-rule