180 reputation
6
bio website
location Magdeburg, Germany
age
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Feb 3 at 9:13

Just a happy little front end developer, nothing fancy to see here ;)


Sep
18
answered Should PDFs open in a new tab?
Aug
29
comment When to show lengthy search hints: always, on focus, after trial, other?
Unfortunately, I don't think the search implementation offers a "did you mean...?" feature.
Aug
28
asked When to show lengthy search hints: always, on focus, after trial, other?
Aug
28
comment Do you need a search button with a search box?
+1 for mentioning that a disabled search button can provide additional info. This applies even to users only hitting enter.
Aug
28
comment Do you need a search button with a search box?
I can't remember how long, but Opera had this feature built-in for ages, with the addition of a (user-defined) search key. I could type "g search term" into the URL bar to start a google search or "w search term" to look on wikipedia, etc. Similar thing in Firefox. In Safari, my search term is usually half typed before I remember to switch to the search box... So yes, I think this changes the way we search, but it's not necessarily new for non-IE/Safari users.
Aug
28
comment Search based on multiple fields - usability
Especially next to an input field 'required' may be interpreted as "I have to fill out this field" rather than "this term will be made a must-have in my search results", despite the check box and what not. At least that automatic connotation had me tripped up for a sec or two...
Jul
19
accepted Is it OK to change label alignment inside a form if labels vary greatly?
Jul
16
comment Can a page rating with feedback be more effective than a longer usability survey for identifying problem areas?
The one advantage that the double choice can have is that you also notice contradicting results, that is: a site with many lovers and haters at the same time. This might be interesting information that you wouldn't get with just one negative option.
Jul
12
comment Best pattern for international address forms?
Memo to myself: Should double check comments before posting... It should read: While most European countries have states... I'm from Germany and as I said, we do not need to add the state in order to get mail. Hence even if the form changes its state selection list to suit my country I'd be even happier if the entire field was just removed.
Jul
11
comment What is the correct usage for toggling triangle icons (down/up) on a click-to-reveal link?
See also this related question and especially the quite comprehensive answer by Michael Zuschlag (currently the second one)
Jul
11
comment Best pattern for international address forms?
@Bevan: While they all have states of some sort, the postal system does simply not require them, hence the typical address format only comprises name, street (potentially with a second line), postcode and city. Every time I get asked for my state I consider it unnecessary information and will leave it blank unless forced to fill it.
Jul
11
comment Best pattern for international address forms?
I really appreciate dropdowns that show the most likely Countries at the top - for the same reasons as Jan. Additionally it also helps with another annoying issue: I frequently type "G", only to find out that Germany is listed under D (Deutschland) - and, of course, the other way around. A list at the top saves me from guessing or checking whether the list is all-English or native countries names.
Jul
6
revised Small real-estate for long list choices
added one more concern with the feedback of check-boxes vs. moving items
Jul
6
comment Small real-estate for long list choices
Additionally, with regard to your mock-up: in a dual list, the effect of one's clicks is immediately clear because items move. Here, I feel like one might be tempted to check the boxes and then hit done to accept these changes... Also, I would test if users take note of the somewhat subtle "show..." links and get their meaning, but this concern might be unsubstantiated.
Jul
6
comment Small real-estate for long list choices
+1 for combining much of the dual list benefits within one panel. I updated my answer to reflect on the two approaches. I really like this version, but added some points to illustrate the benefits of the second list that make the extra space worthwhile.
Jul
6
revised Small real-estate for long list choices
Revised answer that takes the other answers into account
Jul
6
comment Placement of Previous and Next Buttons?
@Sushil: You need to read the slides carefully. As far as I understand (without hearing the talk to the slides) she starts with the (known) recommendation to align action buttons with the input fields. Then she moves on to test this with previous and next buttons, leading to the "surprise layout" were next comes before previous and is aligned with input. Then she quotes studies that show users being confused by the order and summarizes that the recommended alignment should not mess up established expectations.
Jul
5
awarded  Commentator
Jul
5
comment Small real-estate for long list choices
If speed is a concern and more important than initial learnability (e.g. when this is a business software that trained people use every day) then one could get rid of the icons all together and simply move items on click.
Jul
5
comment Small real-estate for long list choices
You're right, the x might be confusing. An arrow to the left could be clearer. The idea is indeed that items move back to the source list, from where it can be added again. Of course, if needed, similar filters could be added to the right. In fact, the above is just a quick draft. In our real use case, both lists are lengthy tables of data records with various columns that can be sorted or filtered, so the whole thing becomes quite complex.