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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Nov 8 '13 at 2:30

In a previous life, worked at MS on areas including accessibility (MSAA, UIA), Win32/Win64, sprinkled with USER/GDI, C#/C++ interop and COM. Currently getting more into web and mobile technologies, still with an interest in accessibility.


Feb
27
comment Do people actually use tooltips?
Note that this varies with the underlying UI technology: in Win32, toolbar buttons use the same underlying field both to determine the tooltip to display and to determine the text to expose to screenreaders; set that one value correctly, and you get both. But in HTML, using TITLE to set a tooltip likely won't help screenreader users; should instead use ALT if using an IMG, or an appropriate technique if using background images - so it's not actually the case that tooltips themselves make UI accessible.
Jan
7
answered Are support for voice browsers really necessary?
Nov
15
comment Dropdown vs map
This is a good argument for going without a map entirely; or perhaps using it to select general geographic regions - as Americas, Eurasia, Africa, Oceania - as that way you can narrow down the selection and still avoid dealing with country border issues.
Oct
26
comment Slider graduations - how many pixels?
Do you have any constraints on the number at all, eg. between 0 and some upper bound, or is it completely open? Even if it is completely open, is there some commonly-used range? (You could, in theory, have a non-linear slider that goes from 0 to infinity or -inf to +inf, but that may not be usable. But could actually appropriate for some scientific domains...)
Oct
26
comment Are “view more” links still being used?
cnn.com ansd google.com/news still has these; it just shows the top 5 or so stories in each category, with a "more stories" or similar link. ABCnews, NBCNews, and news.bbc.co.uk on the other hand, don't have an explicit 'more' link, but clicking on their category headings does the same thing (which is also the case with the two previous sites); the functionality is still there, but perhaps they expect that their users are now familiar with this 'category-items' idiom.
Oct
26
comment Best way to display different site links (eg Google, Diapers.com, etc)
Amazon.com's model might be worth a look also; it pairs a search box with a drop-down that specifies the scope or type of search; it defaults to the entire site, but you narrow it to search only in books, or music, or specifically downloadable music. Also worth noting that Google's results page displays a mix of different types of search: look up Mt Everest, and you'll get page matches, but also the first five images matches, which leads the user in the right direction if they didn't notice the image tab in the first place.
Oct
26
comment Best way to display different site links (eg Google, Diapers.com, etc)
FWIW, one issue with this design is that you end up doing all possible searches first (at least in this visual, given that there's total counts visible), and filtering them afterwards; that's a waste of effort; as compared to selecting a category first and then searching within only that category. If you move the tabs here above the search bar, then you essentially have Google's current idiom.
Oct
25
answered Why are Inverted Colors considered an accessibility feature?
Aug
17
comment Alt key shortcuts anymore?
The tooltips approach works great for sighted users, but a modal listing all keys one after the other may be more convenient for screenreader users to browse - and can also list commands that might not have explicit UI. Have them both, and you have win-win.
Aug
17
comment Alt key shortcuts anymore?
Use of @accesskeys has issues; but that's not the only way to get good keyboard accessibility: gmail has great keyboard support - hit ? to see the list of shortcuts. It works well in their case because the main gmail interface isn't a text-input area, so they can use non-modified keys - eg. c to compose - without having to worry about conflicting with browser hotkeys. As far as screenreader keys go, screenreaders typically have a method to "escape" the next keystroke so that it goes to the app rather than acting as a screenreader command.
Aug
17
comment Alt key shortcuts anymore?
Minor nit-pick: OK is actually a special case, and per guidelines, does't have a letter shortcut. Instead, it's set as the default push-button for the dialog, so is activated if you hit Enter when focus is on something that's not another button. Cancel is also a special case, with a shortcut of escape. (This is mentioned here, though that's not the original source doc.)
May
17
awarded  Teacher
May
17
awarded  Editor
May
17
revised How detailed should a text alternative version of an image be?
added 498 characters in body
May
17
answered How detailed should a text alternative version of an image be?
May
3
awarded  Supporter