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13m
comment Do users object to homepages which contain a full section consisting of a contact form?
@DanielNewman +1. I'm definitely thinking about an A/B test for this. Currently, I have other higher-priority items to get to first with this site, so I probably wouldn't get to test this specifically with users because of that. It's a portfolio site, so the cost of user testing comes out of my own pocket.
2d
comment Intuitive cross-cultural terms for full name and name-to-be-addressed-as
A widely accepted answer to another question was to phrase the preferred name as a question, "What should I call you?": ux.stackexchange.com/questions/15770/…. I did this on my own site's contact form before eventually dropping that field to simplify the form.
Apr
11
comment If I am not the developer and I haven't hired one, how should I explain the development step of my UX design process to potential clients?
5) Development (or web development) is a term that my clients and prospects understand. My largest competitor is a web development company that does much of their work in my industry. They are very feature-driven/-focused in their website copy and don't really discuss user goals or UX. They've worked for a lot of the big clients in that industry and are pretty well-known in the industry. A lot of other companies in that industry hire their local design companies.
Apr
11
comment If I am not the developer and I haven't hired one, how should I explain the development step of my UX design process to potential clients?
3) Agreed. I plan to also include this process in my project proposals and point to it when necessary. ... 4) I see 2 main problems with waterfall. First, design is iterative. In each iteration, a designer can only hope to be "wrong in the right direction". (I saw this in either A Project Guide to UX Design or About Face 3. I can confirm it in my past projects.) Second, people in an industry unfamiliar with UX sometimes don't give feedback on wireframes or prototypes. A recent client only gave feedback on live beta sites. When making their requested changes, I still followed my process.
Apr
11
comment If I am not the developer and I haven't hired one, how should I explain the development step of my UX design process to potential clients?
1) No, my customers are not familiar with wireframes, prototypes, etc. I work on UX design in an industry where it really hasn't been done before. My prospects tend to be marketing directors/managers at mid-sized companies or owners of small engineering/manufacturing companies, all within that one industry. Many of them have spent most or all of their career in that industry. ... 2) Cost is important to many of these prospects. I am planning to have a section of the site for laying out why people should invest in UX design. ...
Apr
9
comment What is the best way to input cm of body measures?
Right, that's what I meant. Sliders are more natural for numbers like 36, 38, 40, etc. The way that I would order the sizes is smallest to largest because that is conventional. It might be different outside the West, but in Western stores I've always seen it done this way. My first job was as a stock person in a clothing store, and one thing I noticed was that if the small sizes are in front all of the clothes of other sizes can be seen easily behind it. This wouldn't be true if the biggest clothes were in front. I'm also not sure how you'd address 1 size being out of stock with a slider.
Apr
9
comment What is the best way to input cm of body measures?
@JohnDoe - Some sites provide a list of buttons where the user just clicks or taps their size. I think that would be the preferable solution because it shows users everything without too much of a bias toward any particular size, and it also is good for making it clear what is in stock and what isn't because out-of-stock sizes are just grayed out. If you can't do that, I'd suggest the select dropdown. To me, sliders seem better-suited for numeric values, such as volume for a music player.
Apr
8
comment If I am not the developer and I haven't hired one, how should I explain the development step of my UX design process to potential clients?
Also, designing is one of my focal points. When I say that I use themes, the themes I choose tend to be minimalist themes that allow a lot of customization. I use plugins to expand those customization options. It's mostly to reduce my debugging work (and save the client money) by providing a starting point that has a lot of the technical capability built in. When I customize the theme through visual design / HTML / CSS, the sites I produce become unrecognizable from the original themes. Most of my clients already use WordPress, so existing themes or child themes are a deliverable they expect.
Apr
8
comment If I am not the developer and I haven't hired one, how should I explain the development step of my UX design process to potential clients?
Thanks. Your assumption on steps 3-5 is correct. The process I posted was only high-level. Here's the full process page, currently in prototype: nl5tjl.axshare.com/process.html. (Please disregard the visual design. I've now started another iteration based on user feedback and it's going to change a lot.) I do multiple rounds of user testing throughout the process. And there's also post-launch analysis and support. How much of each depends on what clients can afford, but it is there.
Apr
8
comment If I am not the developer and I haven't hired one, how should I explain the development step of my UX design process to potential clients?
@PatomaS I'm looking for answers with some of both. I'm a one-person shop and looking to see how everyone else here (whether in larger companies or not) would handle a situation like this. Published/official sources would be a big help.
Jul
9
comment How to convince clients to use a one-page layout?
Thanks. I sent a few of those to the client last night. We have 6 navigation items: 4 for the main content, 1 for the store (also on the main page), and 1 for a separate page.
Jul
8
comment How to convince clients to use a one-page layout?
Thanks! Most sites in their industry have a circa-1990s look and feel or are just blogs with a lot of news articles (their site is not a blog). The other sites were not made by professional designers or professional developers. It's a rather large industry where I only have one company competing with me. I haven't seen any one-page layouts yet, but in a related industry I've seen one with a rather long homepage. I could send them that, but I'll keep looking for a better example to send.
Jul
8
comment How to convince clients to use a one-page layout?
Thanks, I think I was better at communicating with them in their language earlier in the project. I'll need to look at those articles again and see what they say about sales and ROI. I hope I'm able to make the case for this without sounding like I'm arguing or getting badmouthed by the client as several others said in their comments on the OP.
Jul
8
comment How to convince clients to use a one-page layout?
@JonW They're not paying me. It's a volunteer project in my target industry.
Jul
8
comment How to convince clients to use a one-page layout?
@Igor-G I added the articles I sent to the question.
Jul
8
comment How to convince clients to use a one-page layout?
@rk. I told the client that the users' feedback has become more positive with each iteration, and they really liked that. I didn't tell them anything really specific about the one-page layout feedback, but I'm thinking I should send them test videos.
May
15
comment In usability testing, what consensus from users is enough to throw out an idea in future iterations?
@Mervin Thanks. The conglomeration of features for page #2 seems like a good approach for this. For page #4, all 3 ideas contain the same information but present it with different layouts. Should I throw out the Page #4 idea that only got 20% of the vote, so to speak - and keep fleshing out or combining the top two ideas? The client has some restrictions regarding color schemes but gives me some latitude. This test was mostly a test of layouts, findability, and interactions such as signup forms - plus the "which version of the page do you like better?" questions.
May
14
comment In usability testing, what consensus from users is enough to throw out an idea in future iterations?
@LauraPaplaFord Thanks! I moderated tests with 5 users and had 10 more evaluate it via a survey. I was trying to test with 10 users, but the client has a low budget and the rewards we were giving (so far) were not enough to recruit more testers, hence the survey.
May
14
comment In usability testing, what consensus from users is enough to throw out an idea in future iterations?
@MarjanVenema I was thinking of mentioning A/B testing in the question - that's how I think of it too - but went with usability testing because it seems more generic to me. From what I've read today about A/B testing, it seems that is for an at least partially developed product. Mine hasn't gone into formal development yet; it's still in Axure. The way I understand UAT from my former jobs in software development, UAT takes place after development and integration testing are done, and I'm not there yet.
Mar
9
comment What fonts are good and which ones should we avoid for our application's UI?
Title fonts or copy fonts?