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Sep
28
awarded  Student
Sep
28
answered Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
Sep
27
comment Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
@iivel, you may notice that in the question I do mention specifically reCAPTCHA and ask if it is a good way to provide accessibility, if it (or some similar solution) is supported on all browsers and usable by all users with disabilities, and so on. Any insight into that would be very welcome!
Sep
27
comment Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
That's not suitable against the threat model I'm working with. In my situation, the CAPTCHA is being used as a low-cost way to deter attacks that are crafted to target a specific site. I want to deter automated guessing and other large-scale attacks against that site. "Tick the n-th box" is too easy to script up an attack on (for one thing, the number of boxes will be so small that random guessing will succeed with high probability). All I can say is, I did diligently investigate the alternatives, and I do have reasons for saying I want to use a CAPTCHA (and make it accessible).
Sep
27
comment Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
+1, as it may be useful to other visitors -- but as I explained in my response to Polynomial, this does not actually answer my question. I did investigate these sorts of alternatives, and I really do need to use a CAPTCHA, not one of these alternatives. I'm not asking for alternatives to CAPTCHAs; I'm asking about accessibility if I do need to use a CAPTCHA.
Sep
26
comment Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
P.S. To put it another way, you didn't actually answer the question. :-) In my situation, a dummy form field does not meet the same security needs as a CAPTCHA. So, I'm still interested in what I should do for accessibility, in situations where a CAPTCHA is needed (for whatever reason). (Nonetheless, +1, as your suggestion might be useful to others who stumble across this page!)
Sep
26
comment Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
I think saying "CAPTCHAs are dead" is too simplistic. There are situations where they do add value. Your proposal helps against mass attacks (the attackers are spammers who are trying to post spam on a million blogs); for that, you don't have to outrun the bear, you just have to outrun the other victims. However, in my case I'm concerned with targeted attacks that focus on a single valuable site (e.g., the attackers want to create a million accounts on that one site). Your proposal doesn't help with that. So, while I like your answer for many use cases, it doesn't solve my particular problem.
Sep
26
asked Accessibility and CAPTCHAs
Aug
8
awarded  Teacher
Aug
8
revised Are there any studies of users getting jaded of dialog requests?
added 47 characters in body
Aug
8
revised Are there any studies of users getting jaded of dialog requests?
added 728 characters in body
Aug
8
awarded  Editor
Aug
8
revised Are there any studies of users getting jaded of dialog requests?
added 881 characters in body
Aug
8
answered Are there any studies of users getting jaded of dialog requests?
Jul
15
comment Teaching UX theory to beginners
I recommend that this be re-opened. I think it led to some useful answers. The rationale for closing predicted that "this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion" - yet I don't think any of those have come to pass. Instead, I see many helpful suggestions.
Jul
8
awarded  Civic Duty
Apr
30
comment How should a survey (Likert Scale) be presented in a mobile application?
@mystictheory, I think it may be better not to show all questions, even on a tablet. I think there are independent reasons to prefer one question at a time, to reduce the risk that people's impressions of one question affect their answers to another question. You cannot eliminate this risk entirely, but showing a list of multiple questions on another pane increases the risk, so I'm not sure why you'd want to go out of your way to do that.
Apr
26
comment Ways to avoid online contest voting fraud … is SMS account verification too much to ask?
Thanks, @tajmo. To turn it around, that means at least 28% of the legitimate user population will be turned away by a requirement for SMS verification. I say "at least", because you have to add in the number of non-mobile users. (That doesn't count the number of users who are reluctant to provide their mobile phone number, for fear of getting spam.)
Apr
8
awarded  Suffrage
Apr
8
awarded  Supporter