2,370 reputation
325
bio website dennislees.com
location Morgantown, WV
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 28 mins ago

I'm a dual citizen of Ireland and the United States. I'm currently based in West Virginia, though I've lived and worked in Europe and Asia, and have traveled the world.

I'm currently operating as a UX Manager at a large internet security company, and provide web optimization consulting on the side.

I like tech stuff, learning new things, and picking up my cats with one hand to make myself feel big and strong.


1d
comment Canonical names for GUI design patterns
@Crissov Thought you might be interested in this. Just saw a post on my Facebook wall from ui-patterns.com - They've just relaunched the site with a new look and feel, an a thorough reorganization of the content.
1d
comment How to show a workflow on a sequence?
Seconding this point. Your English reads well, it's hard to explain because the concept is complex. It would be really helpful if you attempted to mockup or wireframe what you're trying to achieve, or even part of it, even if it's not what you ultimately need. Then you can say "this mockup doesn't meet my requirements in the following ways", which is a much better starting point then a complex written description.
Nov
25
comment Best place for grid/list toggle button?
Made this a question and removed the request for examples, which are considered off-topic as links to example resources become dated and unreliable.
Nov
19
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
If you insist, but I think this is a better answer than the others and suggest one of the reasons it has fewer votes is that it is much less succinct. Less to-the-point. It's not very scannable, and the key concept is hidden in a summary paragraph halfway through.
Nov
19
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
Thanks Anna, I hope you don't mind my edits. The content was great, just really long. It took me three tries to get all the way through it : ) +1
Nov
18
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
@ADTC Fair enough.
Nov
18
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
I think you're getting hung up on the formal/informal aspect. This isn't about the difference between "Please wait" and "Hold on". It's about the self reference aspect. You may think it's cheesy, but I'm interested in why people do it. And I'm still not sure how you maintain that an ATM saying "I'm contacting the server" is unprofessional. We're talking about the same word here, right? Unprofessional:"below or contrary to the standards expected in a particular profession." If it's unprofessional, what are the standards it fails to meet, or is contrary to?
Nov
18
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
@ADTC I think the point is that non-living entities don't have "selves" to refer to, which is what creates the problem. Not sure what to make of your assessment of "unprofessional". If it doesn't meet professional standards, why not?
Nov
18
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
So basically you're saying that machines referring to themselves as "me" and "I" is the result of an overenthusiastic attempt (on the part of the designer) to increase interactivity?
Nov
18
comment Which anchor text variation provides the best experience?
@IAmJulianAcosta (and Jason C) I think these are valid concerns and I've tried to fold them into an addition to my answer.
Nov
18
comment Canonical names for GUI design patterns
Also: if you're going the DIY route, I just found patternry.com Looks pretty cool.
Nov
18
comment What is the benefit of anthropomorphizing a UI?
I didn't ask 'Why did X do Y?", I asked "Why is Y done?" - there's a big difference. A potential answer to the second question is "because research has shown that it positively affects... etc."
Nov
17
comment Canonical names for GUI design patterns
Nice one, thanks! I did think about listing some resources, but decided against it as that generally gets frowned upon here. I also thought about suggesting that if you decided to go alone and create the one resource to rule them all, give me a shout. I've refreshed my account on uipatterns since thinking about this, and would be keen to contribute to a similar resource if I felt it was going help.
Nov
14
comment Designate two files from a list using comboboxes on each list element. Is there a better way?
"One file must be designated as "type 1" and the second file must be designated "type 2" before continuing. Processing will happen on the two files chosen." This sounds a little specific and confusing. Can break out the user goals in terms of possible actions? i.e. what is the user trying to do, and what options constraints exist.
Nov
14
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Jules a) as an idea, this is far from really bad. It's actually proved to be a valuable thinking tool. b) Assuming the worst from the user, the accidental clicking of anything is a risk in any situation. This design would be bad if it increased the chances of accidental clicking, and it doesn't. 3) The problem of misinterpretation is a risk specific to the words "None of the above" and is not increased in this design. 4) It's clear from the comments on the top answer that we've moved past this suggestion. I don't think any answer here get's it right, so please feel free to add to the mix.
Nov
14
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@rewobs - Good points about default selections and required actions. I think the remaining visual issues could be tidied up with with subtle gray background container that contained both radio buttons. (Balsamiq doesn't allow for subtle enough variations in gray, but you get the point) ux.dennislees.com/rewobs/mockup.png (.bmml & .png ux.dennislees.com/rewobs/rewobs.zip)
Nov
13
comment How to incrementally transition from large legacy system with poor UX?
to get more attention on this, you might consider editing your question to be more about your migration strategy concerns, and less about UX in Agile. That may be your environment, but I've found that questions relating to it on here aren't exactly swimming in answers. For what it's worth, I'm working on a huge transition, legacy system, agile environment, and have some input here, but your question is a bit bigger than I have time to properly contribute to right now. I've marked this and will chime in later.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Alex sorry mate, can't agree with you here. The assumption that users will triple check anything in any situation strikes me as particularly unsafe. We should design for the lowest common denominator and assume the worst behavior from users - I'm not sure I follow the second part of your comment.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Alex this puts the responsibility for validating the form on the user, and requires them to read and act more than they're going to want to. Not the best approach.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Izhaki Your comment about invisible logic making things "far more complex" is barely applicable to this scenario, and is mildly ironic given your promotion of a solution that to the end user is undeniably more complex.