2,350 reputation
325
bio website dennislees.com
location Morgantown, WV
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 3 hours ago

I'm a dual citizen of Ireland and the United States. I'm currently based in West Virginia, though I've lived and worked in Europe and Asia, and have traveled the world.

I'm currently operating as a UX Manager at a large internet security company, and provide web optimization consulting on the side.

I like tech stuff, learning new things, and picking up my cats with one hand to make myself feel big and strong.


Nov
14
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Jules a) as an idea, this is far from really bad. It's actually proved to be a valuable thinking tool. b) Assuming the worst from the user, the accidental clicking of anything is a risk in any situation. This design would be bad if it increased the chances of accidental clicking, and it doesn't. 3) The problem of misinterpretation is a risk specific to the words "None of the above" and is not increased in this design. 4) It's clear from the comments on the top answer that we've moved past this suggestion. I don't think any answer here get's it right, so please feel free to add to the mix.
Nov
14
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@rewobs - Good points about default selections and required actions. I think the remaining visual issues could be tidied up with with subtle gray background container that contained both radio buttons. (Balsamiq doesn't allow for subtle enough variations in gray, but you get the point) ux.dennislees.com/rewobs/mockup.png (.bmml & .png ux.dennislees.com/rewobs/rewobs.zip)
Nov
13
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
13
comment How to incrementally transition from large legacy system with poor UX?
to get more attention on this, you might consider editing your question to be more about your migration strategy concerns, and less about UX in Agile. That may be your environment, but I've found that questions relating to it on here aren't exactly swimming in answers. For what it's worth, I'm working on a huge transition, legacy system, agile environment, and have some input here, but your question is a bit bigger than I have time to properly contribute to right now. I've marked this and will chime in later.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Alex sorry mate, can't agree with you here. The assumption that users will triple check anything in any situation strikes me as particularly unsafe. We should design for the lowest common denominator and assume the worst behavior from users - I'm not sure I follow the second part of your comment.
Nov
13
revised Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
added 266 characters in body
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Alex this puts the responsibility for validating the form on the user, and requires them to read and act more than they're going to want to. Not the best approach.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Izhaki Your comment about invisible logic making things "far more complex" is barely applicable to this scenario, and is mildly ironic given your promotion of a solution that to the end user is undeniably more complex.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Izhaki I'd argue that this solution is more optimal than the other one we're commenting on above, primarily because it gets the job done with much less UI - Your point about "putting users in front of wireframes" isn't helpful because we know end users aren't fully conscious actors assessing every detail in the context of their mental model, especially checking boxes on an insurance form - The only non-conventional thing about this design is that a checkbox also has a clearing function. Is that enough of an issue to cause the user's mental model to crumble? Hardly (cont.)
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Izhaki I agree with others here that this UI makes does nothing to clarify the issue. You suggest in a comment on my answer that we should consider mental models, errors, and recoverability, yet get behind a design that uses a bank of checkboxes inside a radio button option? This arguably breaks the visual relationship between the radio buttons, making the NoTA option seem to drift alone at the bottom. And what if the user decides they want to just click the first radio button? All options are selected? Box group gets highlighted? Error message? Overcomplicated. Makes little sense.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
@Dorus Nice touch on the greying out. But I don't agree re: clearing checkboxes. I don't see the point in complicating things for everyone just because some users 'might' get miffed that we've helped them understand the concept of none. "Hey! I have gout and NOT gout! How dare you clear my checkboxes!" : )
Nov
13
answered Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
Why wouldn't it be? YouIf the user clicks just clicks on 'None of the above' the form behaves exactly as expected. If they click a few other options, and then click 'None of the above' they'll either notice you've foolproofed the form or not : ) You're essentially building in a form of validation, so don't worry about the UI police pulling you up for non-conventionalism. I'll add this as an answer.
Nov
13
comment Adding a “none of the above” option to a list of checkboxes
What about just having the checkboxes function as normal, but add a bit of javascript that makes the "None of the above" checkbox also clear any other already-checked boxes?
Nov
12
revised How can I most effectively communicate design specs to my developer?
Changed question, added tags
Nov
12
suggested suggested edit on How can I most effectively communicate design specs to my developer?
Nov
12
answered How can I most effectively communicate design specs to my developer?
Nov
12
comment User and Role management is a mess
By showing the relationships, and restrictions, between elements, you make it possible to start answering questions around who has access to what, and for what reason. That's going to be your jumping off point for ideating on the UI. You can also use the diagram to add a little more context than you've provided, e.g. what kind of users, accessing what kind of app? Of course, this advice means that you've got more work before you get to the bottom of this, but hey, simple is hard ; )
Nov
12
comment User and Role management is a mess
For starters, your title should be an engaging question; How can I show, How should I differentiate, etc. If you can't condense your problem into a relatively short question, it's more proof that you need to clarify the problem before seeking an answer. My personal approach to this would be to draw as simple a system map as possible. The diagram will serve as a thinking tool, and can be used to better demonstrate concepts like "local level", and "cloud admin".
Nov
12
comment User and Role management is a mess
I think the last sentence in this question sums up why it's not getting attention. You've described a very complex situation, and tucked the question away at the end. Your title also reflects that you have more of a mess than a question. That said, this problem has a solution, and as someone who'll be working on building a proprietary authentication app at some point in the next couple of years, I'm interested in helping you work it out. But before I, or anyone else, stands a chance of suggesting something that works, I think you need to put some more work into the question...