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Apr
21
comment Explaining “circular reference” to a non-technical end user
In a more serious tone though, it is not really that "evil" to hide the unavailable choices from the user - if in doubt, I would test my assumptions by first trying one approach and then another and give it to customers for evaluation. See how they react and then choose appropriate solution based on feedback. (PS: the famous "do not hide options" usability quote was mostly targeted at more static type of user interfaces such as menu options and thus does not apply to this context as much)
Apr
21
comment Explaining “circular reference” to a non-technical end user
True, as befits this whole conversation we're back to where we started. :)
Apr
19
awarded  Critic
Apr
19
comment Explaining “circular reference” to a non-technical end user
This is really BAD answer to the OP question and has nothing to do with UX. PS - I do think, that as explaining the concept of circular references to a layman in a casual conversation setting, this is as good as it gets, but it does not answer the OP
Apr
19
awarded  Editor
Apr
19
revised Explaining “circular reference” to a non-technical end user
nicer quotation of the message
Apr
19
comment Explaining “circular reference” to a non-technical end user
You may disagree with this, but ultimately, there are no hard rules (apart from the ones imposed by technical, physical or psychic constraints) when making UX decisions. It all comes down to the context of the action you are trying to perform. What's the use of providing tons of options to choose from, only to display an error message afterwards. Even worse, if most of the available choices are invalid, you leave the end user picking and choosing by random. Nevertheless, you do not have to hide invalid choices, just mark them clearly as unavailable
Apr
17
answered Explaining “circular reference” to a non-technical end user
Apr
11
comment How to warn a user they are approaching the character limit for a text input field with a soft maximum?
+1 for actually considering the case in question and coming up with what seems to me personally the best resolution to the problem
Mar
28
answered Is 'crazy' good?
Nov
8
answered Is there a name for the UI that marks key positions in a scroll bar?
Sep
13
comment All capital titles: good or bad?
I would upvote this twice, if I could. The bottom line is - it strongly depends on the context and intent.
Aug
31
comment When should hyperlinks be underlined?
well, sory to put it bluntly, but the fact that you personally hate reading is your personal issue and you should not transfer your personal problems into your design. The plain fact is that immense amount of the material on the web is basically textual information, that is intended to be read. Links are just an attribute of a text that should indicate a possibility of finding out more details about the highlighted text. As such, readability should in most cases be the primary overriding goal, indication of clickability should be the close second though...
Apr
5
awarded  Supporter
Aug
30
awarded  Teacher
Aug
30
answered Using “Sign in” vs using “Log in”