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  • 0 posts edited
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  • 27 votes cast
Mar
15
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Mar
15
comment Results count per page drop down location: Top or bottom
Thanks for your input; much appreciated. I just went over to the other side of our office and had a discussion with two sales reps on what they prefer. They both said the top and were a little frustrated about my change at the bottom. So it appears in this use case we may move it back to the top location. Even if it does clutter the interface a bit more than I'm ok with. Usability comes first.
Mar
15
revised Results count per page drop down location: Top or bottom
added 45 characters in body
Mar
15
asked Results count per page drop down location: Top or bottom
Oct
18
awarded  Nice Question
Apr
20
comment Material Design for Web apps?
Material design is a design language not a UX language. It does have some methodology behind certain use cases for UX. The extra click you are referring to is not a material spec. That's a decision made based on the categorization by which inbox does instead of list out all emails in a massive table. it's a method of organization not a UX spec from material.
Jan
24
awarded  Yearling
Jun
26
answered Responsive design - setting a single breakpoint?
Sep
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Aug
22
awarded  Critic
Aug
22
comment Is it ever okay to have multiple rows of tabs?
Late to the conversation here, but this is the correct method of doing it. @FrankL I would change that arrow to say "More >". Indicating there is more navigation to be seen. The only problem then becomes how do you solve for the extra navigation tab. Where does it go when the tab becomes active? The only way around the latter issue would be to make the "More >" tab the active tab giving an indication of where you are in the navigation without specifically saying what it is you are in. That is where a page header comes in handy.
Apr
18
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
2
awarded  Commentator
Oct
2
comment Is there a problem with using black text on white backgrounds?
@TonyBolero ...continued... To soften web contrast and make it more readable like print material you generally want to reduce to an off black or off white for users because they are viewing it on a monitor of some sort that's back lit. Creating problems when a pure black and pure white combination is in place.
Oct
2
comment Is there a problem with using black text on white backgrounds?
@TonyBolero Take a look around you with your own eyes at printed materials. The fact that monitors are back lit is what creates the harsh readability of pure black on pure white for web. You can get away with black on white for print easier than the web because the best white paper is never absolutely white and the best black ink is never absolutely black. Paper displays a different color, depending on the light source under which you are viewing it. So contrast on print material is never the same for anyone viewing the material.
Sep
10
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
27
revised Is there a problem with using black text on white backgrounds?
additional information
Jul
26
comment Coming soon pages - best practices?
@sree Thanks, but that was only somewhat helpful. I'm aware of what typically goes on 'coming soon' pages; in fact nearly everything that was in that thread is what I already expressed above. I suppose my post was geared more towards whether or not adding a 'get notified email input area' was really worth the extra development (and if users actually interact with that element), and if there were any other ideas beyond what I mentioned that would be beneficial.
Jul
25
answered Is there a problem with using black text on white backgrounds?
Jul
25
revised Coming soon pages - best practices?
added 1 characters in body