1,084 reputation
313
bio website technophobia.com
location Lincoln, UK
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Jan 10 at 10:03

User experience designer at Technophobia.com

7 years digital experience working with exceptional clients, including Alfa Romeo, Green Flag, Pizza Express, Becta, Safestore Self Storage, Poundland, Roundup Weed Killer, Microban and Keyfuels.

Creative lead on design and build projects using advanced HTML and CSS techniques.

Specialties
Semantic web site architecture, user interface development (UI), user experience design (UX), information architecture (IA), web design, digital communication, flash animation, HTML, CSS

http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinrapley


Jun
26
comment What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
I don’t understand why you think it is too vague; Are you seriously going to give a different label to each subsequent deep linked page? They will just be subpages. The hierarchy here is the hang off ‘hub.’ Not advised, but if there were further deep pages under the ‘Entries page,’ and perhaps deeper again off of those pages. Naming each of those levels does not scale well. Keep it simple.
Jun
26
comment What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
The issue I have with this is that a page can be split up into sections (which is why we have a section tag in HTML5), so section to me is a very granular page level term which won’t translate without causing confusion to the hierarchical structure.
Jun
26
comment What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
No, I don’t believe it does. A hub is a central focal point, a place where all of the jumping off points for relevant pages within that particular section are held within a single interface.
Feb
5
comment Empirical measures of performance
Aye, I normally rate this on easy, medium, hard, assist or fail. I would be interested to hear you expand upon your measure of this performance criteria.
Feb
5
comment Empirical measures of performance
@BenBrocka I am looking for ideas from both sides of the coin. Results don’t have to be quantitative, I am looking for empirical measures after all. I will certainly post in Cog. Psych. too though, thanks.
Feb
5
comment Can you characterize a user by their choice of Internet browser?
@Rahul I don’t think the answer is not useful, and I disagree about your comment on the test being biased by putting the browser in full-screen mode. The point is you are testing the interface of the website or application within the browser, the test is not about the browser itself.
Feb
4
comment How do I make it obvious that Autocomplete suggestions are not mandatory?
Furthermore, if there is no limit to the amount of Twitter IDs you want to search on and add, you could add a button that allows the user to add additional batches of 5? Once button is activated, further 5 fields are added to the bottom.
Feb
4
comment Can you characterize a user by their choice of Internet browser?
I just had a further thought. Microsoft have had to recently provide a screen with Internet Explorer to inform the user that other browsers are available tomshardware.com/news/Microsoft-browser-ballot-EU,9705.html — this may have migrated some users over to other browser vendors.
Feb
3
comment Quick search on the left, or on the right of a home page?
Yet, this isn’t search per se in the sense that you describe. This is searching for a place to book, so would it conform to the same classic conventions of a site search? I personally think not.
Feb
2
comment Quick search on the left, or on the right of a home page?
Welcome to UX StackExchange Matt. It is good to see another Yorkshire lad on here. I hope you have fun :)
Jan
29
comment best way to design data query builder
A little confused. Are the users creating database tables through the GUI, or just surfacing data that is already in a database, or both?
Jan
29
comment Relationship between anthropomorphism and NUI?
Please could you post the articles preaching designers to avoid anthropomorphism? I am stunned to hear this as in Interaction Design, beyond human-computer interaction, it says “furnishing technologies with personalities and other human-like attributes makes them more enjoyable and fun to interact with. They can also motivate people to carry out various activities, such as learning.” — I tend to agree, you only have to look at virtual assistants to see the value.
Jan
28
comment How do I limit the number of options a user may choose in a list?
2 fantastic and creative solutions. This would be my best answer.
Jan
28
comment What is the author referring to with “UX mail lists”?
The author may well have done. If they did, it was very subtle and was not the takeaway that I got. You could always ask him directly @Stephenturbek twitter.com/Stephenturbek
Jan
28
comment How do I limit the number of options a user may choose in a list?
It is just how it works by default. No need for a reference. When you select an option, the option is shown within the input area.
Jan
28
comment How do I limit the number of options a user may choose in a list?
Balsamiq: balsamiq.com/products/mockups
Jan
28
comment How do I limit the number of options a user may choose in a list?
This will take up slightly less screen real estate than the 2 select boxes I shown in my first example but you will need to also consider the following: 1). This is only good for limited amount of options, the example of select movies would be too long a list. This is only good for high recall 2). You will need a JavaScript fallback, which will likely be the 2 select boxes option 3). Possibility of confusing users as this is not usual behaviour for select options (being able to use it multiple times), and the control itself normally displays answer 4). You will need to disable after 2 choices
Jan
27
comment Breadcrumbs and selected page
@BenBrocka You are still referring hierarchical links to breadcrumbs! It is a common misconception, and the giveaway really is in the name.
Jan
27
comment Breadcrumbs and selected page
I think you are confusing breadcrumb trail with hierarchical links. A breadcrumb trail will track exactly where you have been, so the example shown by @rlemon is valid. What you are describing in your answer is hierarchical links, which yes, will follow the directory structure. Think of Hansel and Gretel when you think of breadcrumbs, they need to retrace their steps, so it is in fact a history!
Jan
27
comment Piloting end-to-end UX process for IT staff on intranet
The only issue I can see arising from such a pilot test is that IT staff have a higher tolerance for sub-par UX, which means they'll complain only about overly convoluted elements. Can you back this up with evidence that this is true?