1,103 reputation
316
bio website technophobia.com
location Lincoln, UK
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen yesterday

User experience designer at Technophobia.com

7 years digital experience working with exceptional clients, including Alfa Romeo, Green Flag, Pizza Express, Becta, Safestore Self Storage, Poundland, Roundup Weed Killer, Microban and Keyfuels.

Creative lead on design and build projects using advanced HTML and CSS techniques.

Specialties
Semantic web site architecture, user interface development (UI), user experience design (UX), information architecture (IA), web design, digital communication, flash animation, HTML, CSS

http://www.linkedin.com/in/kevinrapley


Oct
28
awarded  Excavator
Oct
28
revised UI Design Patterns for image upload and management
OP meant ‘UI’ instead of ‘UX’ Design Patterns in question title
Oct
28
suggested suggested edit on UI Design Patterns for image upload and management
Oct
28
comment What semantics should the back button in a wizard UI have?
You have asked 2 different questions; (i) What semantics should the back button in a wizard UI have? and (ii) What functionality of the “Back” button in a wizard UI is the best? — Which question do you want answered? Please either reword the title or the content to reflect the actual question you want to be answered.
Oct
28
comment How do you determine the order of tasks in a usability test?
I think you are confusing a 5 second test with usability testing. This does not answer the question of the OP.
Oct
28
comment How do you determine the order of tasks in a usability test?
You briefly mention removing biases at the end of this post, but you begin by adding a large bias of presenting tasks that are most important to the researcher (not the user) first. You cannot be certain that users will be more engaged and focused at the beginning of a test. They may take time to warm up and understand what is required of them.
Oct
28
comment How do you determine the order of tasks in a usability test?
I would advise against taking the advice in this answer that has been marked as correct. Doing so will cause results to be subject to a compounding variable. It can take participants some time to warm up to what is required in usability testing, and they can also tire if the session lasts up to an hour. By randomising the order that tasks are presented, these compounding variables can be counterbalanced.
Oct
5
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Jan
12
awarded  Yearling
Aug
14
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
awarded  Yearling
Nov
23
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
26
comment What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
I don’t understand why you think it is too vague; Are you seriously going to give a different label to each subsequent deep linked page? They will just be subpages. The hierarchy here is the hang off ‘hub.’ Not advised, but if there were further deep pages under the ‘Entries page,’ and perhaps deeper again off of those pages. Naming each of those levels does not scale well. Keep it simple.
Jun
26
comment What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
The issue I have with this is that a page can be split up into sections (which is why we have a section tag in HTML5), so section to me is a very granular page level term which won’t translate without causing confusion to the hierarchical structure.
Jun
26
comment What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
No, I don’t believe it does. A hub is a central focal point, a place where all of the jumping off points for relevant pages within that particular section are held within a single interface.
Jun
25
revised What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
Fully answered question with my thoughts around what the pages should be called.
Jun
25
answered What should internal “home pages” and “index pages” be called?
Jun
20
asked Usability of linking to target ID on page refresh