844 reputation
45
bio website
location New Albany, IN
age 26
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Feb 6 '13 at 13:41

I'm a builder. Specifically, I build solutions to problems using code.

But when I'm not happily immersed in something, I (board and video)game, read, and box. Come on down to Terry Middleton's boxing and say hello if you're interested.

Here's my career's page, if you're interested.


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Jan
6
awarded  Yearling
Jan
8
awarded  Guru
Jan
6
awarded  Yearling
Jan
3
awarded  Mortarboard
Jan
3
awarded  Good Answer
Jan
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
2
comment Do people really want to look at multiple windows at once?
@AnnaPrenzel Your welcome. As a developer, my examples skew that way, but note that any business person you talk to has several different programs open at once to fulfill some business task they are working on. And, this leaves aside entirely the concept of task switching, where you leave multiple windows open on one desktop, and switch to another desktop to change tasks. The computer keeps your entire "state" available for you to switch back to, like having part of your desk for one thing, and using another part for something else instead of getting rid of your old item, which isn't finished.
Jan
2
answered Do people really want to look at multiple windows at once?
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
@codeinthehole The op said that he went down this path to solve a problem his users were having. I believe this is a better solution for the underlying problem he indicated. But, I'm not in his userbase, so he should do some testing and find out what actually solves the problem instead of listening to me pontificate.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
@codeinthehole No, no. There is two separate saves going on. You are always able to do a normal save with feedback. But, behind the scenes the program keeps a rolling backup of your current version. If the system crashes, you can restore from the backup or the original. I suggest you check out how vim works with it's swap files, tilde files, and undo files. Every time my vim instance has crashed, or I lost my remote connection, I could restore to where I was without data loss.
Jan
6
awarded  Teacher
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
@ThomasClayson Yes, autosave can be alarming. Namely, because most versions overwrite the current file. You want to save "draft" copy or some such, so that if the user quits without deliberately saving, they go back to the old version. A very large number of people use this as poor man's version control.
Jan
6
awarded  Supporter
Jan
6
answered Should I provide feedback from a save button?