387 reputation
29
bio website tclayson.com
location Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Jul 15 '13 at 12:21

I am a professional mobile and web developer.


Jul
15
comment Connecting to WLAN (WiFi) without screen
Wow thanks for all the info. Lots of time and effort put into this answer. Very interesting. Thanks!
Aug
23
comment What ways are there to highlight a selected option or link without using bold?
Hi, I've had a play with colours and because the background was dark and color apart from white wasn't showing up nicely. So I've changed the background color of the <p> element around the item and put the screenshots in my first post. What do you think? I think its quite garish personally, but what do you think? Thanks
Aug
23
comment What ways are there to highlight a selected option or link without using bold?
That's not a bad idea, although on the dark background I may not have as much choice on the colours. :) I'll have a play with that.
Apr
16
comment How can I distract / entertain people in an app while waiting?
Only problem is I've just done it and not been able to read the quote. Very annoying. Its good, but I'd prefer a "continue" button to come up once its loaded so I can read the quote completely if I want to. Similarly a checkbox "continue automatically on load" would be a good idea when I get bored of reading the quotes.
Jan
9
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
I agree @JGWeissman, however I'm not targeting you or me with this program - I'm targeting users who use Microsoft Word day in day out. The kind of people who use internet explorer because they don't know that you can get different browsers, and even if they did then they don't know why they should bother changing because "everything works in internet explorer". ;) I need to give the most intuitive platform for my users, and I believe that disabling the button will cause unnecessary confusion. There are other ways I can alert the user to unsaved changes.
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
I always use google docs, and I work on a Mac 100% of the time. However, my intended users work on Windows computers, use Microsoft Word, Microsoft Outlook, click the "Apply" button then the "Ok" button when using the control panel and all sorts. I'm not trying to be cutting edge and modern (unfortunately) I'm trying to make my application useable and accessible. It needs to have an interface that is simple, useable and intuitive. I don't think that auto save (for the demographic I am targeting) is intuitive unfortunately. Maybe in a decade.
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
@fluffy what's the reasoning behind this?
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
I wish I could do this, this would help everyone. However I feel that this could confuse the intended audience of my application more so than just not providing feedback on a button.
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
I inserted a movie into the document before saving it clever! :) Yeah, I understand you answer but normally this usually happens very quickly and goes largely unnoticed by the "average" user. Contrast this to web apps for instance. If you click save usually you are presented with the same page with a persistant notification (usually in green or yellow) saying "Saved" or "Your email has been sent successfully" or something. The reason for providing the feedback on the button was to lower the intrusion level to make it obvious but not annoying.
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
I tend to agree, however the "evidence" points to a different conclusion. When I'm in Microsoft Word, or Excel, or any similar programs there is NO indicator (that I have noticed) that I have started editing, and often I will come back to an open Word Document and think to myself "have I saved this yet?". If this is wrong then why has no-one thought to change this in the many iterations of the Office suite? i.e. why don't people approach new software with the preconceptions based on their use of Microsoft products? This is my dialemma
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Tom, absolutely not. I'm not asking about the actual button itself. What I'm asking (as is clear in the question) is whether the act of "Saving" should be acknowledged at all. It is the prerogative of the answerer how they interpret this, whether it is the case that the feedback should occur on the button itself (which is a nice idea, that's where the user is focussing, and its not intrusive to their experience, as an alert dialogue would be) or whether there is some other feedback to let the user know their action has completed successfully.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Based on the opinions here I have since created a new image, a gif with three states. "Save progress" (as above) an interim "Saving" with a rotating circle animation and a "save successful" with a tick. I will attempt to put the finished graphic in my question for reference
Jan
6
comment Is it better to use generic icons for 3rd party branded software or system specific icons?
Yeah, thats exactly how it looks, word icon next to the sentence "Save as Word Document" :) Thanks for this.
Jan
6
comment Is it better to use generic icons for 3rd party branded software or system specific icons?
Hmm, but this then becomes boring and "drab". I understand why this would solve the issues, but in keeping the the design of the application it would be best to have an icon of some description. Google apps has a generic unbranded spreadsheet icon on the left there, which I know isn't quite the same, but allows for some diversity in the design.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Hmm, an interesting point. I suppose the point here is that a user might come to the program to edit something and might want to "revert" to the original last-saved state of the form. Take the example of Photoshop for instance. You work from a PSD. This is a file which you open in photoshop, edit and save changes to. It doesn't "auto save" or anything like that. Then you export to jpg (or other). Its not quite the same, but I'm aware that "autosave" might be alarming or confusing for its own reasons.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Yeah I'm aware of this, but its really subtle. Similarly a lot of code editing programs have the name of the file in the title bar with a star (*) next to it if the file has unsaved changes. The star then disappears when you save. However this is also pretty subtle, and I'm not sure if your "generic computer user" will have the technical knowledge to understand these cues.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
This is a useful insight, however I steered away from this in my application as I (and I'm aware others) "enjoy" what I've come to know as the lift/elevator theory whereby clicking a button (or pressing the "call lift" button) multiple times somehow reinforces the action (or makes the lift come quicker). Obviously this isn't the case, however it is nice to be in control of the application, rather than the application "locking" certain controls. This was the theory behind not disabling the button.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Thank you. So you're suggesting that the fact that there is never any user input makes the button ambiguous? I had never thought about it like that. Just out of interest, why is the interim "Saving" state necessary? Does it reinforce the user's idea that something is happening?