382 reputation
29
bio website tclayson.com
location Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
age 23
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Jul 15 '13 at 12:21

I am a professional mobile and web developer.


Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
I tend to agree, however the "evidence" points to a different conclusion. When I'm in Microsoft Word, or Excel, or any similar programs there is NO indicator (that I have noticed) that I have started editing, and often I will come back to an open Word Document and think to myself "have I saved this yet?". If this is wrong then why has no-one thought to change this in the many iterations of the Office suite? i.e. why don't people approach new software with the preconceptions based on their use of Microsoft products? This is my dialemma
Jan
8
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Tom, absolutely not. I'm not asking about the actual button itself. What I'm asking (as is clear in the question) is whether the act of "Saving" should be acknowledged at all. It is the prerogative of the answerer how they interpret this, whether it is the case that the feedback should occur on the button itself (which is a nice idea, that's where the user is focussing, and its not intrusive to their experience, as an alert dialogue would be) or whether there is some other feedback to let the user know their action has completed successfully.
Jan
7
awarded  Good Question
Jan
6
awarded  Editor
Jan
6
revised Should I provide feedback from a save button?
added 199 characters in body
Jan
6
awarded  Scholar
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Based on the opinions here I have since created a new image, a gif with three states. "Save progress" (as above) an interim "Saving" with a rotating circle animation and a "save successful" with a tick. I will attempt to put the finished graphic in my question for reference
Jan
6
accepted Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Jan
6
accepted Is it better to use generic icons for 3rd party branded software or system specific icons?
Jan
6
comment Is it better to use generic icons for 3rd party branded software or system specific icons?
Yeah, thats exactly how it looks, word icon next to the sentence "Save as Word Document" :) Thanks for this.
Jan
6
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
6
comment Is it better to use generic icons for 3rd party branded software or system specific icons?
Hmm, but this then becomes boring and "drab". I understand why this would solve the issues, but in keeping the the design of the application it would be best to have an icon of some description. Google apps has a generic unbranded spreadsheet icon on the left there, which I know isn't quite the same, but allows for some diversity in the design.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Hmm, an interesting point. I suppose the point here is that a user might come to the program to edit something and might want to "revert" to the original last-saved state of the form. Take the example of Photoshop for instance. You work from a PSD. This is a file which you open in photoshop, edit and save changes to. It doesn't "auto save" or anything like that. Then you export to jpg (or other). Its not quite the same, but I'm aware that "autosave" might be alarming or confusing for its own reasons.
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Yeah I'm aware of this, but its really subtle. Similarly a lot of code editing programs have the name of the file in the title bar with a star (*) next to it if the file has unsaved changes. The star then disappears when you save. However this is also pretty subtle, and I'm not sure if your "generic computer user" will have the technical knowledge to understand these cues.
Jan
6
asked Is it better to use generic icons for 3rd party branded software or system specific icons?
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
This is a useful insight, however I steered away from this in my application as I (and I'm aware others) "enjoy" what I've come to know as the lift/elevator theory whereby clicking a button (or pressing the "call lift" button) multiple times somehow reinforces the action (or makes the lift come quicker). Obviously this isn't the case, however it is nice to be in control of the application, rather than the application "locking" certain controls. This was the theory behind not disabling the button.
Jan
6
awarded  Supporter
Jan
6
comment Should I provide feedback from a save button?
Thank you. So you're suggesting that the fact that there is never any user input makes the button ambiguous? I had never thought about it like that. Just out of interest, why is the interim "Saving" state necessary? Does it reinforce the user's idea that something is happening?
Jan
6
awarded  Student
Jan
6
asked Should I provide feedback from a save button?