179 reputation
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bio website
location Szczecin
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jun 8 at 18:37

I'm a C# developer from Szczecin, Poland. Certified as MCTS in Windows applications.


May
14
comment Why is the input field always at the bottom of a chat window?
@EvilClosetMonkey I'm actually curious what percent of world population uses left to right writing system. Anyway, I feel it's only the top to bottom aspect that matters here (horizontal direction is irrelevant for the question), and bottom-to-top hardly exists in the world. See omniglot.com/writing/direction.htm#rtlvbt and omniglot.com/writing/direction.htm#ltrvbt
Apr
11
comment What should the character limit(s) for first/last name inputs be?
@MichaelKohne 1024 is a round number to me. Am I a nerd?
Jan
12
comment Should “Yes, delete it” be red, or green?
If I saw them without words, I'd be more likely to guess that red means "delete", and if I got it wrong, then it would be more likely because of the position, not the color (like Dave, I'm used to Windows "ok / cancel" convention as opposed to Apple's "cancel / ok"). BTW here's how Springpad does it: i44.tinypic.com/28s0heo.jpg
Dec
18
comment Helping users understand that two, and only two options must be selected
@Serg - the more compact size is precisely the problem in my opinion. Saving on space (at the cost of convenience and forcing one to do more clicking) should come from a specific need, and not be a default choice.
Dec
18
comment Helping users understand that two, and only two options must be selected
When my mum will see just the first screen (the one with "Defaults Selected"), she won't know that she can deselect Option 4 by clicking it again etc. Generally it doesn't encourage her to use the liberty of customizing default choices
Dec
18
comment Helping users understand that two, and only two options must be selected
Sorry but it feels clunky and very 1990s to me. It's not particularly comfortable. Note that if you selected "Item 3" and "Item 4", but realize that you actually want to select "Item 3" and "Item 2", you need to: a) click "Item 4" on the right list; b) click the <-- button c) click "Item 2" on the left list d) click the --> button. That's 4 clicks. Not a smooth experience. Compare it with ux.stackexchange.com/a/49127/10579 (my favorite) - just 1 click, drag and drop "Item 2" from the left onto "Item 4" on the right.
Dec
18
comment Helping users understand that two, and only two options must be selected
I wouldn't use a dropdown list unless I had no choice. A regular listbox is much better. There's only 8 options in this case, why would you want a dropdown. joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000063.html
Dec
18
comment Helping users understand that two, and only two options must be selected
I like it. A good thing about it is that - unlike eg. @pcattai's answer - it allows for explicitly overriding one of your choices. I mean, once you've already selected both options, you don't need to unselect anything prior to selecting another one. Because this UI inherently "knows" which of your previous choices you want to replace.
Dec
18
comment Helping users understand that two, and only two options must be selected
Dropdown lists are one of the most uncomfortable controls, let alone when there's only 8 options (as the OP says). Joel's criticism still holds: joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000063.html
Dec
1
revised Ergonomics of computer code
added 372 characters in body
Dec
1
answered Ergonomics of computer code
Dec
1
comment Ergonomics of computer code
@MarjanVenema - thanks... In my view, the way the program (be it IDE or PDF reader) presents the document to you - does count as user experience, of course. The way the coder wrote the program, or the way the writer wrote the book, however - does not, unless we're really stretching definitions for the sake of an intellectual exercise etc.
Dec
1
comment Ergonomics of computer code
@MarjanVenema I can read a novel in PDF, and then you can say that reading this novel becomes a part of my user experience (while I'm using eg. Foxit Reader), but does it mean that creative writing questions, too, fall in the scope of UX? : ) What doesn't, then?
Dec
1
comment Ergonomics of computer code
IMHO it's not a question for neither StackOverflow nor UX (as reading source code is not typically considered to be a part of user experience, personally I think your postscriptum is bit of a stretch ;)). Programmers StackExchange is probably the right choice, though code style matters have been discussed to death there. My 2 cents on this very subject: programmers.stackexchange.com/a/112723/29029
Oct
20
comment What is an aesthetically pleasing font for programmers?
I do use DejaVu Sans Mono on Windows. Why not?
May
29
comment Which phrase is better: “Sort chronologically” or “Sort by date”?
It's not an everyday sort of word, but it is of Greek origin :) It's "cronologicamente" in Italian (using Google Translate), "chronologicznie" in Polish, "cronológicamente" in Spanish, "chronologiquement" in French, "kronologisk" in Norwegian etc. My point is not that it should be widely used in UI, I agree that it's not a very good choice. My point is that - contrary to what you suggested - being a non-native English speaker doesn't really much change the likelihood of being familiar with this word
May
29
comment Why does the email subject appear before the body when composing an email?
@MichaelKjörling "Do you also fill in the recipient(s) after you finish composing the mail body? Or do you bychance decide on that up front, before starting to compose the mail?" - I obviously know whom I'm writing to beforehand, but I don't fill in the recipients until the mail is done - this is to prevent against accidentally sending an incomplete email
Sep
3
revised Best approach to designing a long multi-level side menu
added 521 characters in body
Sep
3
answered Best approach to designing a long multi-level side menu
Sep
2
awarded  Scholar