Hot answers tagged

134

Yes, you should allow Zooming. I have changed my mind on this from having worked on RWD projects in the past. Originally my opinion was 'people only used to zoom on mobiles because the site wasn't designed to work on a mobile, but that's not the case with a well designed RWD site' however I changed my opinion, partly from some user testing that was ...


21

As Kyle Schaeffer put it: You should only disable the zoom feature if it enhances users’ ability to consume content on your site. If you’ve formatted your design layout so that users don’t need to pan or zoom, the zoom feature actually impairs the user from navigating your content (which only needs to scroll vertically). If you’ve incorrectly ...


17

I have missed the zooming ability on most of the mobile optimized sites I've seen. Mostly because links and buttons are too small or to close to each other (the text size haven't been a problem). I usually switch back to the ordinary desktop view. BUT: A well designed app should not bump into such issues... So, that brings us back to the essence of ...


17

Based on my mobile user research, I would rather not to disable the zooming option. People I have interviewed during usability studies were coming with the same mental models they had created while using desktop computers. It means their goals and habits do not change. As long as people are used to zoom (especially in pictures and infographics), we should ...


13

The zoom feature mainly came into the picture to allow users to examine a product in detail and overcome the challenges involved in actually being able to handle the merchandise before buying it.This is especially common in sites which sell products like clothes or products where users might want to get a closer look at the product before making a purchase. ...


12

If it's a mobile site, you should enable zooming. It's true that native mobile apps don't allow zooming, but I think the users have different expectations for native apps vs mobile sites. You may think the font size you picked for your mobile optimized site is... "optimized," but you can never guarantee that. People with eye sight problem would always ...


10

Please please please never disable zooming. Ok, you might have thought you got your website design right, you might have thought that you got every font size right, and every photo was clear enough that your users never needed to zoom in on anything. So your users would come to your site, the mobile version would kick in, and they would merrily scroll up ...


10

The fact is, it doesn't matter what you think. You shouldn't disable scroll wheel zoom just because it's better for you because you are not your typical user. For those using Google Maps embedded into your page, users are going to have have some pre-conceived expectations of how it should behave - i.e. they expect it to behave like Google Maps in its normal ...


7

I realize this is a old question but I found it and wanted to add my option for future users that may find this, also this is somewhat personal. I am legally blind and when I'm on my iPhone i often have to switch to the full version of a site if they don't offer pinch to zoom. Under accessibility setting the text size doesn't work for safari. I can't read ...


7

You could just draw a box on the first chart that signifies what area is highlighted in the second like so: Alot of games use this to signify which part of the map you are seeing on your screen out of the whole map. Or if you don't want to impede the viewing of the first chart with the overlay you can have a mini-map type view above the second chart ...


6

Yes - I've seen this here at Bravissimo.com It's actually got a very slick feel to it. There is a jquery plugin called cloud zoom from Professor cloud - You want the inner zoom option. This is what the website above is using.


6

My philosophy is to not purposefully block any existing functionality without a good reason. Mobile sites need to not require zooming, but since you don't have to develop it and you actually need to invest more in blocking than in allowing it - why not let users have it? We block functionality when it's a matter of error prevention, of not letting the user ...


5

It may be worth reconsidering displaying any zoom text at all. This is how twitter deals with zooming: The question I would ask is whether or not displaying text is redundant/necessary. Does the user need to know the zoom percentage? Is this game going to be available for mobile devices as well? If so adding that extra text field is going to reduce the ...


5

A few additional ideas to address your zooming differentiation question: Instead of an overlay, you could try a preview window with a much simpler version of the chart. Here is an interactive example: http://demos.zingchart.com/view/BWTCT87D This gives users their bearings quite effectively without obscuring the chart area and using ...


4

I know this may be a big ask, but pretty much every user has become so familiar with the functionalities available on Google Maps that they expect most zooming interfaces, especially maps, should behave in the following ways. Double Click to zoom in Use mouse wheel to zoom in or out Additional zoom slider control On a touch screen, two fingers pinch and ...


3

For those wondering why NOT allowing pinch-to-zoom might (sort of) be becoming a convention, I can offer my opinion based on my current problem. Fixed position elements. The only way (as far as I have figured out) to get it to work nicely on older OS's is to disable pinch-to-zoom. It would be awesome if mobile browsers did not essentially stop Javascript ...


3

I am attending An Event Apart right now and a question like this came up - can you prevent or disable features for the user that they are otherwise used to having on their device. The answer was unanimous that best practice is you should not do this, but you can anticipate and build in ways to respond to it. By the way another part of the conference brought ...


3

Selecting, Zooming, and Panning You pretty much have the right ideas. The Windows User Experience Interaction Guidelines provide standards for this. For example, page 437 specifies: Single-left-click selects. Single-right-click opens the context menu. Double-click (left or right) selects and performs the default command. Single-shift-click (left or right) ...


3

It's possible that using touch gesture(s) in this instance to interact with the camera zoom may not be the best choice. Yes, faking a zoom on the client is one potential option, however you're still going to need to incorporate the real image at some point, possibly after some additional movement (i.e. left and right) has occurred - this disconnect could ...


3

The slider has many advantages over two buttons: single widget for single purpose (zooming) graphically shows the relative zoom factor indicates how much more zooming in/out is possible (the buttons' enabled state would only indicate when the min/max zoom level is reached) selection of the preferred zoom level by dragging (compared to clicking multiple ...


3

The obvious answer is to render the elephants standing on the turtle's back, but there are other options. Having the map snap back to fit to the edge on zoom out could be confusing, as the user will expect the zoom at the edge to behave in the same way as zoom in the middle. You could however make the map slowly drift back to fill the empty space. A ...


2

Good question! The true solution will come from usability studies conducted on the device you are working on. However, generic best-known methods would indicate something in the following lines: Controls should not fade out. That would be the system taking over decisions (the decision to operate or not) from the user. You should go back to no blobs. This ...


2

The SIMILE timeline widget provide a two scale timeline.


2

A mechanism used in some cases is simply to click with the mouse at the point about which you want to zoom in/out and then drag the mouse up to zoom in and down to zoom out. Typically a 2D view can be click-dragged via the left mouse button, so usually the click-drag to zoom would be off the right mouse button. In some applications a modifier like ALT is ...


2

I think in your case I wouldn't invent a new zooming process, just simply use what Google Earth does! (which is also a desktop app) On the other hand what extra features does your product include what Google Earth doesn't have?


2

Though I would like to go with what elumalai suggested i.e using Cntrl (+) and Cntrl (-) (or command (+) or command (-) in Mac's) to zoom in and zoom out respectively ,the challenge you would face with that approach is that these are system defined shortcuts and unless you can find a way of overriding them,you will not be able to use these. Hence I would ...


2

I'm afraid I can't directly answer the research part of the question, but I can rant about my personal opinion, for what it's worth: One long-standing problem I have had with zoomable interfaces is that they expand things rather than zooming. The human brain is really very good at keeping track of where stuff is. It already uses a zooming interface and has ...


2

Asking for patterns and precedents to emulate is going to be quite hit and miss, because there is no universal pattern for zooming. There are many different ways of implementing this sort of behaviour, each with advantages and disadvantages for different use-cases. Without knowing what sorts of information you present, how your users expect to navigate it ...


2

Pinch or not to Pinch. The Pinch feature is by no means a must as is expressed within native apps - it is used as a specific enhancement to UX. For example: imagine trying to manipulate a photo on mobile without pinch zoom! I'm sure it would be cumbersome. However, reading apps for example RARELY have the feature as it doesn't fit with the task at hand ...


2

I do not comprehend why zooming is suppressed. The whole purpose of zooming is to read what is on the site. If our eyes cannot read small print we need to zoom to prevent severe eyestrain. If it is suppressed to make sure we see the ads - keep in mind that we will not bother using the site at all if the print is too small. Also, why are so many people ...



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