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9

Jon's answer is great and has the basics, but here's more detail in case you need it. 1) Figure out your audience. This could be customers, staff members, etc. Depending on your application you may have several types of audiences, and that's okay. 2) Come up with some user stories. These consist of roles and desires, involve both your audiences and ...


9

Simply put: Figure out WHO this project is for. Who are they, how do they act, what is their level of expertise. Business requirements, what needs to happen (interaction wise) to make the right amount of $ What information do they need to get to. How should they get to it in the easiest way possible.


7

Three ideas for you to google around: Jeff Patton's User Story Mapping Luke Hohmann's Innovation Games Dave Gray's Gamestorming Story mapping will get you to a specification of user stories (aka requirements) and give you an overview of the system in a similar form to Todd Warfel's task analysis grid and Indi Young's mental models The ...


5

Design techniques that come in my mind (which are not solely UX). I tried to sort it from unsharp to more precise. Brainstorming, which has its focus on throw out ideas rather than comment them. Collect ideas. Use a Artist Diary where you sketch and write ideas that come into your mind. Always have it with you. Idea is a elusive and flawy matter. Collect ...


4

I think the key is to make sure its perceived as valuable and actionable right away. Personas, use cases, card sorting, its all non-actionable at first. To shake them up, I would start by opening up the website and everyone say whats wrong with it...write down all the ideas. They will have plenty. THEN, the challenge is to make sure the ideas are smart ...


4

You will learn how to talk about and defend your ux decisions and beliefs. Perhaps, you may not learn as much as you could at home reading. Nonetheless, speaking in person with other UX designers helps you to rationalize your beliefs and realize that there is often more than one good solution. You'll hear stories first hand that you may be able to relate to ...


4

The game you choose depends completely on your intention with the course. What do you want your audience to remember in 3 months? What is the single most important thing you want to share about UX? I would go for this "game": Create groups of 3-4 persons Give them accesories to create paper mockups (paper, pencils, colour pens, siccors, post-its, ...


3

I went to a UX 101 seminar way back in the day where people were grouped together and asked to redesign an experience (eg - visiting the DMV, mailing a letter, etc.), rather than just a UI element or component. They were asked to break down the process into steps, and then redesign those steps in a better way. This was very effective for two reasons: 1 - It ...


3

Big fan of: mental notes KJ technique (http://www.uie.com/articles/kj_technique/) collaborative UI sketching exercises We use sketching a lot ... either (1) the whole team working in parallel on designs, followed by a review workshop with the client (the workshop is the 'deliverable', not the sketches themselves), or (2) even collaborative sketching ...


3

This is interesting because I am doing exactly the same thing! I have to do mine on Friday. This is my basic agenda Explain what UX design is What makes good and bad UX? I then go into some design rules I use, such as consistency, accordance that kind of thing. Doing a join in session where we critique a UI and suggest improvements. Show some Good UI ...


3

Glad to see Jakob on UXExchange. :) I went to Usability week a few years ago. This was one of the first times I realized the difference between UX Research (Nielsen) and UX Design (Norman). Although I value research, my heart (and personal talent) were on the other side of the coin. I am a "Norman" rather than a "Nielsen". At that session, I heard Bruce ...


2

See this question on Quora: What are some interesting playdecks to get creative/design inspiration? Stephen Anderson posted a long list there of various card decks, grouped by type (creative thinking, psychology/design, design methods, etc) that should be of some use. You may not find what you're looking for. The reason is that I think your approach may ...


2

It does not appear that Jakob's "Fundamental Guidelines for Web Usability" is designed to teach you how to do a user test but shares a lot of what Jakob and his team has learned from years of experience doing user tests. That is very different from what Steve's workshop which is designed to get you doing user testing quickly. I have attended the ...


2

Conducting Workshops are hands-on approach, develops facilitation skills & learning from users, stake-holders - which should drive in greater confidence against being better knowledgeable by reading and writing blogs. Definitely conducting workshops are +1 point ahead. You can compare it with it even writing research papers and presenting in front of ...


2

Is is no doubt that you learn better by doing than reading. And experience definitely is a key element in UX practice. But at the same time you also have a lot of theoretical literature. Topics that are inadequate for workshops. So the conclusion is: 1) You need to read on your own and study the discipline to gain a platform of knowledge. This is ...


2

Talk to some users. We're currently doing some simple group interviews and surveys. The primary purpose of this is to learn what real people care about, so we know where we should focus our efforts. But also, by holding them in different employees' homes, we've got more than just the UX team talking about users. The company president, lead developer, and ...


2

For an one-hour general introduction, honestly I'd put good time on hodge-podge of recent neuroscientific studies, peppered with some anecdotes and classic examples of good / bad design. The time should be enough to also discuss a hands-on example, either taking apart something most people in the audience know, or a compelling "daily work" example. ...


2

I cant think of any specific scenarios off the top of my head, but there are examples of lots of games that may help you during the process here: http://www.gogamestorm.com/ (There is a book and an iPhone app I believe). If looking for real world (as opposed to digital based) examples you could give them tasks to design various appliances and other every ...


1

You may want to check out these (free) resources. They all have many ideas for design thinking activities. I'm not sure if there are any specific to wireframing, but even if not, they may give you some inspiration: Design thinking for educators Human-centered design toolkit ps. I had a third link, but apparently I'm not allowed to post more than two as a ...


1

Take three 'volunteers' and give each a very simple written persona. They then play the part of that user. Split the others into small groups and give them a simple design challenge. Ask them to design an inclusive solution that meets the needs of the three different 'users'. The three users then judge the proposals. Depending on your audience, you might ...


1

What topics should one cover? What do you want the audience to get out of it? Where is the audience now? I spend quite a bit of my time getting dev and ux folk to play nice together. I generally have three approaches depending on the context: 1) Find the biggest pain point in the way they're working together now and try and fix that. For example if ...


1

Captain and Peterchen have given really good answers.Here is how I would structure it Give a Brief introduction about User experience and mention it with how it has changed the way software is perceived and how it can make a huge difference in sales as well as effective adaption (The use cases of Apple and the $300 Million dollar button (Amazon) would be ...


1

I have been to Usability Week twice: in Sydney 2009 and San Francisco 2010. Both times I found the material was very useful, informative and usually well presented. They make good use of video examples of actual users during testing and this is both enlightening and often entertaining. Like a lot of IT related material though, it can be a bit dry and perhaps ...



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