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2

Have you read or seen this article before? https://medium.com/circa/the-right-way-to-ask-users-to-review-your-app-9a32fd604fca Describes the issue you mention and seems like from the numbers it was a great solution. I guess the bottom line is to make it natural in whatever your interface is - the banner ad suggested doesn't really do this in a great way, ...


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It is an interest concept for a group, but I think your divide and conquer approach, with individual group members working on different screens, leaves a valuable opportunity unrealized. If, instead, you had all of your group members work on the same screen (or group of screens) seperately but simultaneously. Then when you gather back together, compare ...


5

When deciding between a modal and inline entry, consider what is communicated to the user by your choice: Inline Blank Entry "You're going to be doing this a lot, so we don't want it to be a big deal." "Don't worry too much, this is easy to fix if you make a mistake." "We expect you to enter multiple items." Modal Dialog "Please focus. This is too ...


1

Your pros and cons are pretty solid. The only contention I have is that I don't think that a person needs to hunt for where action happened in the case of adding it inline. If the user has to enter many items at a time on the list, inline will feel much smoother. The big risks I'd see with inline are if any of the following are true: Item entry requires ...


1

Generally, it’s okay to guide a flow with disabling, as long as it's truly absolutely required to do one thing before another (not just good practice or advice). However, it’s even more important to provide the user as much flexibility and fewest modes as you can. You say the order of the functions is not the issue. Rather, the issue is to ensure the user ...


1

Don't block the user. Layout the form vertically with the stuff that doesn't depend on anything else at the top and most users will fill everything in from top to bottom. Provide inline feedback as they edit their input so it's instantly clear when they need to change their input (or lack thereof) If a situation arises where hand holding is necessary then ...


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It depends. If the program is for a tech savvy user, or a user that knows the effect of their actions, do not block anything. The user will want a free experience, that allows them to do whatever they want, error or not, because they already know what they want to do, and why they are doing it. But, if the user is more basic, disable options that would ...


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Enforcing a flow as opposed to dealing with an error than can be avoided is desirable. Just make sure it is obvious why the disabled options are disabled (i.e. what needs to be done to enable them). If it makes sense in your context you may consider hiding the unneeded options until the proper time. However going this route would produce other ...



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