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32

There's a million things that you could to do to grow your skills and make yourself a better UX designer. Here are some ideas off the top of my head: Talk to your manager about how you can grow your skills to help the team out. Conduct a baseline usability study on the most recent version of the product that you designed and determine whether users are ...


32

No. While it seems to be annoying, I see four problems with not having to enter the login information again: I will remember my new password better if I have to type it once more. (I keep forgetting my new e-banking password because I don't have to re-enter it, and I of course don't store it in the browser.) If I want to store the password, the browser PW ...


30

In my opinion: YES. The authentication has been done when the password is reset, so the user could be logged in. And it annoys the hell out of me when after password reset I'm not logged in. I can't think of any case I wouldn't want to be logged in after resetting password, why would I even ask for password reset if I don't want to log in?


17

You should have the buttons at the bottom right because: The standard for modals is to have the buttons at the bottom, so it is likely where people will look for action buttons It is a more natural visual flow reading in a Z pattern, and one that has become entrenched. A button on the right is typical for a submit button as it has the feeling of moving ...


15

In your experiences, what has worked well, and what would you make sure you never done again? Works Well: Be a designer who develops AND a developer who designs. White board concepts and solutions with developers as you either flesh out features or solve technical solutions. Be willing to bend and compromise and stand up for your ideas. Expect ...


14

If the war room is for making a tight deadline, then I'd say the comment from @Roger-Attrill is perfect. Especially the coffee. Don't forget the coffee. However, if it's used for brainstorm sessions, there might be some other components you can use for an effective and most of all creative brainstorm session. Make sure people inside the room don't get ...


14

As msparer suggested, Stating the main action first and then offering context/side effects is a very good step to take. The other thing I'd definitely do is to label your buttons descriptively. It could look something like this: Are you sure you want to close all transactions on terminal x? Closing will also print the transactions of 11/20/2014. ...


13

This answer applies to most presentations, not just UX ones. A good presentation is like a story, where you take your audience on the journey that you want them to experience. If you send the presentation to them ahead of time, you lose the ability to take them on that journey. There are other potential negatives as well in that your audience may start ...


12

Try shopping anything on amazon without logging in first. Browse -> pickout the item -> add to card -> proceed to check-out -> log-in -> continue with address selection and payment. Amazon can easily be the top player who needs to worry about user flow and logging in :) So, YES, login should just be a step outside the flow and back in i.e. find ...


12

Custom HTTP error pages improve web sites' experience, security Opening paragraph: Every web server can display HTTP error pages, but default error pages don't provide useful information to your visitors. Some error pages may even leak sensitive information about your site, such as URL or file paths, database details, and even code. But you can ...


10

Is it even neccessary to show how many children are left to be approved at all? How many administrators will be doing the approvals? If it is more than one then the task will probably be split up anyway (please correct me if I'm wrong) so instead of showing the progress bar you could do one of the following: on approval of one listing ask the admin if ...


9

The Previous button should not act like the Back button. The Previous button means "go to the next-lowest numbered step"; the Back button means "go to the screen you were on before this one". In any given context they may have the same effect or different effects. So here are two paths the user could take. Step 1 Next→ Step 2 Next→ Step 3 Previous→ Step 2 ...


7

The Right Information Firstly, make sure your displays show the information the user needs to make good decisions and input. The use of a color-coded matrix assumes that your user is trying to achieve a certain pattern of assignments, such as a certain number of people in each duty type per day (e.g., have adequate coverage when some are on vacation), or ...


7

I follow a similar process but with an extra step - flow design. I prefer, as I'm the UX person, to know what it is the user needs to achieve. I like to either use pre-written (or I write them myself) use cases based on what the stystem needs to help the user achieve. To use a website example: As a customer I want to be able to add an item to my basket, ...


7

A problem I see there is that the initial action has an implied consequence that might confuse your users. According to your mockup, the transaction day gets closed as soon as the data gets printed. It seems like "Printing" is the main action and closing the transaction day is the side-effect. It really should be the other way round. Name the CTA "Close ...


6

I have a copy of the book Communicating the User Interface. I think it may have the sort of examples you're looking for. You can download a sample chapter for the Kindle.


6

Cancel buttons can be extremely useful. For example, in the screenshot below it gives me peace of mind in knowing I can successfully exit the process at any time. Especially useful with forms requiring multiple steps. Closing the window on a page/step 2 can cause confusion as to what will happen with the data you have already supplied. This is where I would ...


6

This is my second answer; posted after the OP updated the question with more info. The left suggestion gives you the option to "download files" by pressing a button for each list item. Once the files has been downloaded, an icon indicates that. The text on the button is enough to make the following states understandable, no matter your exact choice of ...


6

Rather than trying to display this audit trail in a single, very large and complicated diagram, consider presenting it as a log with a simple diagram for each change. In my wireframe below, I am showing the history of a single task. For each record, I am showing a brief description of who did what and then illustrating the flow between steps with a basic ...


6

I started out doing front-end development, and shifted into specializing in UX so I spent a lot of time doing the Photoshop/Illustrator to Browser routine. When I joined the team I'm on now, I had to adapt to an Agile environment and have managed to find a balance that works well. Mind you, on the small team I work on I'm one of those 'unicorn' types that ...


5

I would push back on the recommendation in this case unless the person can give you a business case or user story that specifically requires a cancel button. If the primary method of navigation to this form is via bookmark or in a list of internal tools/links that people bookmark, and the form is not clearly part of a hierarchy or other discernible ...


5

In describing a place where "where they sit and and brainstorm" the term think tank is perhaps more appropriate. The term war room originated as a term to describe the command and control center to wage a real war. The English war rooms that Churchill used in World War II are an example. A key characteristic of any war room is the need to keep all ...


5

Update: This answer is no longer addressing the intended question, since the OP clarified. Is a calendar ever worthy if it is sometimes only displaying a subset of all the events? Here are some quick sketches on an all-or-nothing approach. Instead of having to decide to take action for each and every meeting/document, the list of items has a top bar, ...


5

At SmartyStreets, we just revamped our checkout experience and went through the same questions you are asking. Quick intro: To use our service, an account is required, so users must either login or create an account on-the-fly as they go through checkout. The top part of the checkout form (see an example), users are asked to login if they already have an ...


5

Being able to do things using different ways is a good thing. People discover parts of the application differently and follow different paths towards a goal, so if you provide them more ways to get to the same result, it makes life easier for your users. One example of an application that does this well is Word 2010. To align my text, I can either use ...


5

Do you start with wireframes or with a couple of rough design sketches to direct the interaction designer. Yes, and no. Its important to be able to move between design visuals and not constrain yourself to a waterfall model (1-2-3-4) without the ability to redo previous work. A good examle of this is Jesse James Garretts 5 elements, where you start at ...


5

Present a warning to the user about the consequences of deleting item X, i.e., download bmml source – Wireframes created with Balsamiq Mockups The 'consequences' could be a cascading delete (as I've shown above), or dereferencing X from the various related items (i.e., "Item One will no longer know about X"), depending on your use case.


5

All private shopping sites that I know of don't even show their content to anyone that is not signed in. You could choose to show your content to everyone, but then it's simply a shopping site. Asking someone to sign up or log in to your site is a barrier that has a chance of pushing them away. So you should present the barrier at the time when you have ...


5

Why is it wrong? OpenID has several drawbacks: You're actually going to a totally different website in order to register or authenticate. This is not how things work ordinary. For years, registration and authentication for a website was done on the same website: the user was moved to a different website either because he wanted to, or because he was ...


5

Some points for good labeling are: Short – 'submitted' vs 'uploaded_for_processing' Distinguishable from each other – bad: 'uploading' and 'uploaded', good: 'uploading' and 'submitted' Same styling rules – try not to mix verbs and nouns and use same case Understandable – user should know business process to match labels in UI to business phases For ...



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