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Apart from sensitivity, "abort" by itself is open to too much interpretation. It is often used in circumstances where the user is able to repeat and action and so it's not as final as discussed in many of these answers. Even a file transfer can often be restarted. Considering the immediate effect, use Stop, Pause or Interrupt. You may have some context ...


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My instincts tell me that while not a big deal in general, it would be prudent to use an alternative if you can think of one. Words differ not only in the potential severity of an unintended meaning but also in how (un)likely it is that someone would think of these unintended meanings in a computing context. Examples: kill is problematic because of its ...


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Historically, the Abort/Retry/Ignore question in MS-DOS was a result of an I/O subsystem which had no way of reporting problems from the disk sector level through the file-system level to the underlying application. If an application asked to read some data from a file, and block 1571 of the disk was unreadable, there was no defined mechanism by which DOS ...


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I once called a state of a collection of data (visible in a diagnostic app) "Stillborn". This turned out to be too creative. I'm not a native speaker of English and the intended meaning was "Staging finished, state of data invalid or unknown, further processing not possible." As soon as the app was released I received strong pushback from ...


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Yes, avoid using it. Probably... Some perspectives: Developer language vs user language. Abort and Cancel may have nuanced differences to a developer but to a user, factors like familiarity and friendliness are a lot more important than accuracy. An extreme example of user-language vs developer-language is placebo buttons which do absolutely nothing ...


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As a former officer in a pro-life political action committee who is also a software developer: I never found the use of the term "abort" in a software product offensive or disturbing. To "abort" a process is to kill it before it has a chance to complete its intended operation. To "abort" a baby is to kill it before it has a chance to be born. We regularly ...


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Are the listed words really synonyms? I cannot provide any references now (possibly because many software developers/producers do not consistently follow the distinction, either), but my impression is that at least abort and cancel are slightly different: Cancel sounds pretty much like a routine operation. You can cancel something before it has really ...


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The words have subtly different meanings. Stop means to prevent something from continuing, but not necessarily permanently. E.g. stop video playback. Terminate means to stop permanently. E.g. terminate process. Abort means to terminate before completion. E.g. abort file transfer. Cancel means to make something void. E.g. cancel subscription.


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Like Matt mentioned abort is a more of a technical term, so whilst we would use it everyday, it's not quite laymans enough. Though saying that, it really depends who you are building it for, if it's devs thats fine. If you're making it for a regular person off the street, they would eventually understand "abort" means to stop the process, so why not use the ...


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Like everything, this will depend on context. However, "Abort" is one of those 'computer words' that isn't normally used by people in everyday conversation, along with things like "terminate" and "submit". It's one of the reasons that in the past, people had to take computer literacy courses in order to understand technology. Thankfully, User Experience and ...


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Window title: External changes detected Message: Unsaved changes to this file will be lost. What to do with these changes? Buttons: [Save] [Skip]


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A similar scenario I have come across is with Prezi.com where you can make slides/presentation online. When you already have a presentation open in a tab and you open the same presentation again in a new tab, a message pops up stating, "You are already working on this file in another tab. Please continue there" The above scenario and your case fall under ...


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You can't, but there's a better way Sometimes, concepts are too complicated to communicate in a few words. This is especially true when the consequences of miscommunication are large, such as overwriting a file. The best practice here would be to notify the user as soon as you know that there is a conflict (that might be while the user is editing, or ...



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