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1

You should make it easy for the user to cheat. "I see you didn't run 2 km yesterday. Do you want to delete this task and completely forget about it?" Too often messages to the user sound like they are nagging or chastising them. An app should be written as a friendly helper, not a disciplinarian. If a user doesn't want to do a task, nagging will mean they ...


0

0% could potentially mean a small percentage, but not completely immeasurable. A 200-pound being losing just under 1 pound would have lost 0%, but it is by no means nothing at all. Use No weight change when nothing has been lost or gained within normal variation. Saying "No weight loss" sounds like "Well, you didn't lose any weight... you put some on ...


0

I'd go with [+/-] <Amount> <Weight Unit>/<Duration unit> e.g. +1Kg/1Week or -2Lbs/1Week or 0Kg/1Day, so the difference per duration is clear. Regarding the percentage, it isn't clear what the percentage is relative to - What does the 100% represent? E.g. initial weight, desired weight, weight at the beginning of the current time frame or ...


6

Neither Taking Max's (great) answer further: Who on earth measures weight changes in percentages? The problem with percentages In general, percentages are always a proxy variable and mostly little intuitive. Everyone has to expand some cognitive effort to do the maths, and quite a few struggle with the percentages maths (some can't do it at all). ...


35

Is there room for no weight change This is then easy to understand, and is clear that it's not any gain either. Like the answer, I think you'd more than likely say something like "my weight hasn't changed since last week" On a similar note, a 2% loss doesn't mean much to most, so would it be better to say 6lbs weight loss (2%)


32

The most appropriate is NO According to one of the 10 Usability Heuristics for User Interface Design by Nielsen: The system should speak the users' language, with words, phrases and concepts familiar to the user, rather than system-oriented terms. Follow real-world conventions, making information appear in a natural and logical order. When you tell a ...


1

The problem with the term "User Experience" compared to "user friendly" is that it is too vague and too comprehensive (and perhaps too technical) for marketing purposes. The criticism (we professionals) raise against the "user friendly" term is exactly what makes it so marketing friendly: 1) We say that "you can't use that term because it only reflects a ...


1

For your second issue, I'd make it a button that states "click here to connect your first device", and that button then leads to the page where the user can connect their devices. This way, you subtly encourage their user to connect a device while not being so negative. If you want, you can make a corner or the side of that button have a different function ...


3

You already have the phrases that will work, I believe. And a few that won't, as you've no doubt recognised. When a device gets connected The first choice assumes that connection is always a result of a direct user action, so not merely because someone walked into Bluetooth range, for example. Also, the phrase can be ambiguous. "You have connected" is a ...


2

As you said the first option sounds like an immediate response as soon as the connection is established. The only problem I have with the rest of the choices is they are singular by nature. Although you said users wouldn't often connect multiple devices they will sometimes and when they do simply stating "Connected device found" will lead them to ask "Which ...


2

I think you describe something like badges, which is supplied in Material Design Lite (MDL) and in Bootstrap (and probably many of the latest web frameworks). MDL provides a definition: The Material Design Lite (MDL) badge component is an onscreen notification element. A badge consists of a small circle, typically containing a number or other ...



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