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40

If it's clear, say it in the least number of words possible. If there is no confusion, then there is no problem. "Import image" - clear. "Create app" - clear. "Add description" - clear. For further reading, I suggest the Android Writing Style.


31

A good error message should: Let you know what the problem is. Make you feel like there is something that you can do about it. Speak like a human, and be a consistent extension of the personality of the rest of the application. For generic error messages, you can't do much about the first point, but you can do something about the other two. Do something ...


22

As noted on the Android Design Principles Writing Style page: Friendly Use contractions. Talk directly to the reader. Use “you” to refer to the reader. Keep your tone casual and conversational, but avoid slang. By saying 'Oops' - in English, a commonly accepted way of acknowledging that an unexpected event has happened, in a non-frightening way - we are ...


20

Conventions and the conscious breaking of The vast majority of people don't have their mouse buttons swapped. Even people who use the mouse with their left hand, often keep the buttons as they would normally be (myself is an example for this). Thus, people who swap these buttons can be considered in UX as complementary personas (people with special ...


17

I believe that's a preference thing. The main thing is to be consistent with what you decide. It could vary on what section of the app you are talking about too. For example, your buttons and titles might be Title Case capitalized, while your links might be lowercase. Again, just be consistent within the sections that you are standardizing.


10

You should limit the label to some action word if possible. This also makes it easier if you want to replace the label with an icon. Add Create Import And if the context is ambiguous, add a descriptor. Image Contact Description There are cases where you might want to skip the action and directly use the descriptors. Eg: for login, many sites just ...


9

A lot depends on your audience and your product, but in general the term "Millions of colours" isn't particularly helpful. Do you mean 2 million or 786 million? If you're selling a new DSLR camera, the common jargon is 12-bit, 14-bit, etc. and not the number of colours - so that is what you should stick to. If you're talking about software (especially ...


8

I would describe the options in terms of "quality", with technical footnotes. This teaches the user at a high level what a phrase like 16 bit vs 32 bit means. It also provides the information for more technically minded users to get exactly what they want. Color Example: Low Quality (8 bit) Medium Quality (16 bit) High Quality (32 bit) Audio Example: ...


7

Take a look at how Twitter did. 1 - The clearly display the amount of characters available. The user know instantly if he is within the limit as he type. 2 - If the user types beyond the limit, 2 visual cues are displayed (highlighting of the extra characters and character count is in red) also sumit is disabled. I think they absolutely nailed it. Clear ...


6

Using informal language makes the error message more human and less intimidating. It also makes the blockage for the user less frustrating if it's language they can find humor or familiarity with. It's very much like adding a quirky illustration such as the Twitter 'fail whale' to lighten the situation. Like using "Error" or "Invalid" it is wise to add a ...


5

The Apple terminology dates back to a time when the options in the list were: Black & White 4 16 256 Later, it changed to: 256 Thousands Millions The amount of millions doesn't matter for two reasons: The number is really a relative measure of size and is presented in sequence with others like it. "Millions of colours" in isolation isn't ...


5

Here are the icons that the Dutch 'Kijkwijzer' (viewer guide) uses: (There's also PEGI, an equivalent for computer games) These are pretty clean indicators of what the content contains without any judgmental indicators like danger colors or exclamation points. I don't think you're allowed to use these icons, but you can take some inspiration from them. ...


5

Sadly there is no standard for the name of such an email - all your suggestions are used. But consider the following: Verification Email - used when you can still access services, but need to verify you email in the meantime. Activation Email - used when services (account) are not accessible until email activation takes place. You can argue that there is ...


5

I think that Save as … should always have a file as result. I wouldn’t use this term for a database record which (probably) is only part of a file. In a database context, it could be used to export/save a specific record in a file. Clone or Duplicate might work. But I think in general (→ there might be cases where this doesn’t apply) it’s not a good idea ...


4

This is by no means definitive, but it is where I would use them and why: Contact refers to a single person, so it is something that I would suggest on a blog or personal site. Contacts refers to a list of contacts (usually in an address book), so I would avoid it on a website unless referring to a list of contacts rather than the action contact. Contact ...


4

Depending on the tone of the application you can use something like: "Oops! Something went wrong." - Send error report to help us improve your experience "The application has encountered an unknown error." - Send error report for diagnosis. Google chrome uses a generic error: " Google Chrome quit unexpectedly." - Ignore, Report or Reopen. You can follow ...


4

The following trademarked PEGI descriptors (as Peter mentions) are shown below and used for videogaming. These are Europe wide classifications but in the UK replaced the BBFC ratings when the PEGI system was given a government approval. Note that here PEGI have used the term descriptors as opposed to warnings or anything that is attempting to be positive or ...


4

If the better thing to show is the median, show the median and call it the median. If they don't know what it is, they probably won't appreciate the difference anyway. If they do know what it is, they'll appreciate you clarifying you mean median and not mean. If they don't know that a median is a type of average, they probably aren't mathy enough to really ...


4

Here is good advice from the Android team. Enchant, Simplify, Amaze: Android's Design Principles. I almost live by their guidelines :) To answer you question though, "System busy, Try again later. -> I'm busy, Can you come later" -> This has quite a mean tone and the user might not like it. the "I'm busy" part is quite in your face. "Welcome to xxx. -> Hi ...


3

The user may do many things with the PDF document, but I don't see any reason that you need to refer to any specific action. Simply state what the link is or use a very general action (like 'get') if you feel the need for an verb. So, I would suggest using: PDF of this page or Get PDF of this page The example that you gave of just 'PDF' is simple ...


3

My recommendation would be to go for Natural language options such as "Download this page as a pdf" as it gives a textual representation of what you would get when you download the pdf. You also need to realize that unless your ALT tag is well defined for the pdf image, having a textual description along with the image would be helpful for screen readers . ...


3

If you are going to enforce a policy on password strength, I would suggest the following approach: If the password which the user typed in does not meet your criteria then you display the message 'Weak Password. Make your password stronger by using ...' and ask them to try again. Even if the user moves on to the next (retype) field, show the error in the ...


3

You should use neither of them. When you are referring to vertical content, you should say "scroll up" or "scroll down". Vertical content movement has been used for decades now, and there is no good reason to change the terminology. Yes, you are swiping, but you shouldn't refer to how it is done, just what you want to achieve. We say "click on X" not ...


3

Yes. Apple use the terms "swipe up and swipe down: http://www.apple.com/iphone/iphone-5/tips/ The Apple HCI Guidelines may be of use here in conveying defined actions: On avoiding redefining gestures: ...


3

In most cases buttons don't have to follow the rules of grammar. Notice they rarely have periods even when, like yours, they are complete sentences. Use the choice with the fewest words that is not ambiguous. Apply the rules of usability in preference over grammar rules. If you want to get grammatical and talk sentence construction rules. . . ...


3

Grammar largely depends on the language of the viewer I have a few websites that I maintain that are read around the world. Rather than paying a company to rewrite all of the copy on the sites, we've been using the Google Translate Widget to allow visitors to convert the text from English into their own language automatically. One of the things to consider ...


3

Stick to established patterns where possible. "Save As.." to save the current work into a new file/entry/record (instead of overwriting the existing) is the standard in most software that users will have used before. Clone to me feels like something I'd do before changing something, not after changing it and then wanting to save it as a new copy. An ...


3

The label in a button is considered a caption. Thus, style guides have it these need to be capitalised. Oddly, a few style guides recommend the use of Sentence case rather than Caption Case for captions. See this answer for more.


3

The CTA "Add post" is in itself a sentence. The word post is (I'm assuming) not a product name but rather a word like any other word in a sentence and should be treated as such. Using the Title Case should be limited to writing titles, for CTA's (Call To Action) (<-Look, Title Case), you should use Sentence case because that lowers the cognitive load of ...


3

To expand on a previous answer by @DA01, I agree that this sounds more like an "About" page than a "Home" style page. Otherwise, your page may have a bit of an identity crisis. Is it clear enough and useful to the customer in that state? [...] Support, etc. Based on that, it sounds like this page may be too general. Support is not usually on an ...



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