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39

Answer "No". "Successfully" can be removed: Joel Spolsky covered this issue very well here: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000062.html The basic rule of thumb is that: "In fact, users don't read anything. This may sound a little harsh, but you'll see, when you do usability tests, that there are quite a few users who simply do ...


23

I wouldn't put pronunciation guide on the company's landing page because it's distracting. Landing pages should focus user's attention on the main content. Instead of a description of how to pronounce the company name, perhaps a description of the site would be much better. Put pronunciation details in the About Us section or footer of the site if people ...


22

Conventions and the conscious breaking of The vast majority of people don't have their mouse buttons swapped. Even people who use the mouse with their left hand, often keep the buttons as they would normally be (myself is an example for this). Thus, people who swap these buttons can be considered in UX as complementary personas (people with special ...


22

As noted on the Android Design Principles Writing Style page: Friendly Use contractions. Talk directly to the reader. Use “you” to refer to the reader. Keep your tone casual and conversational, but avoid slang. By saying 'Oops' - in English, a commonly accepted way of acknowledging that an unexpected event has happened, in a non-frightening way - we are ...


17

I believe that's a preference thing. The main thing is to be consistent with what you decide. It could vary on what section of the app you are talking about too. For example, your buttons and titles might be Title Case capitalized, while your links might be lowercase. Again, just be consistent within the sections that you are standardizing.


17

If done correctly it could be advantageous from a marketing perspective. As an example, early (admittedly TV) advertisements for Hyundai used the slogan: All day, every day, Hyundai as a way of re-enforcing the pronunciation of the brand name. This was important as if 3 people had 3 different ways of pronouncing it, it'd be unlikely that any would ...


16

There is another issue with the word "successful" that I experienced in our SaaS. We provide a function in our application, where you can send stuff via email. However, the only thing we do is to send the email. The message used to be "Email successfully sent." User feedback then made us realize that they got the message more or less wrong as they believed ...


14

You could pick one from thesaurus.com: I personally love the stealthy aspect of anonymous and would choose something like the following: incognito ninja


11

I'm going to disagree with the others and say that sometimes the word successfully is meaningful. I agree that in many cases it is redundant and in those cases is not needed, however there are cases where it is useful. Mostly this applies in partial success cases or cases where you may expect an error. For example if you are validating a hard disk, then ...


9

If the landing page is for explaining what your company or product is or does, you could emulate a dictionary entry at the top of the landing page. I have seen this done on occasion, but it should only be done if it fits your style. Credits to Google for the original dictionary design


8

If the name is made up of two common words, then putting them together like "MyBrowser" will make it much easier for customers to find you. Otherwise, search engines will look for both words as separate tokens and return a lot more unrelated stuff. Also, having the words together clearly communicates that your name is a name and not a description or tag ...


7

Take a look at how Twitter did. 1 - The clearly display the amount of characters available. The user know instantly if he is within the limit as he type. 2 - If the user types beyond the limit, 2 visual cues are displayed (highlighting of the extra characters and character count is in red) also sumit is disabled. I think they absolutely nailed it. Clear ...


7

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


6

Using informal language makes the error message more human and less intimidating. It also makes the blockage for the user less frustrating if it's language they can find humor or familiarity with. It's very much like adding a quirky illustration such as the Twitter 'fail whale' to lighten the situation. Like using "Error" or "Invalid" it is wise to add a ...


5

I think that Save as … should always have a file as result. I wouldn’t use this term for a database record which (probably) is only part of a file. In a database context, it could be used to export/save a specific record in a file. Clone or Duplicate might work. But I think in general (→ there might be cases where this doesn’t apply) it’s not a good idea ...


5

How about using "userxxx" or "visitorxxx" where xxx = some number. Eg. user312 (something similar to what is used here at stack exchange) or visitor312 That way the user who is writing the comment need not reveal the identity and the owner of the post does not get the feeling that some random unnamed entity is commenting on his post. Here the presumption ...


5

How do you think the word "successfully" affects the user experience? Is it something that should go away or is it all right to actually have the word in messages? Ambiguity "Operation X completed" can be ambiguous, for example: Microsoft SQL Server jobs produce messages like this when a job fails. Since the message doesn't always imply a successful ...


5

Since it's a CLI, I don't think you need to explain too much. I'm assuming the end user is somewhat tech savvy, so they should be used to doing it the way you describe. My only recommendation is adding a hint at the end. i.e Do you where glasses (y/n):


4

Here is good advice from the Android team. Enchant, Simplify, Amaze: Android's Design Principles. I almost live by their guidelines :) To answer you question though, "System busy, Try again later. -> I'm busy, Can you come later" -> This has quite a mean tone and the user might not like it. the "I'm busy" part is quite in your face. "Welcome to xxx. -> Hi ...


4

"I can imagine tha you may get users to read by providing good button labels. If the button label is always "OK" then yes, noone will read anything and just click away. If your button labels provide the action or in Y/N dialogs something like "Yes, do it anyway" you probably have a better chance of people reading the text above (user thinks: "anyway? wait... ...


3

The CTA "Add post" is in itself a sentence. The word post is (I'm assuming) not a product name but rather a word like any other word in a sentence and should be treated as such. Using the Title Case should be limited to writing titles, for CTA's (Call To Action) (<-Look, Title Case), you should use Sentence case because that lowers the cognitive load of ...


3

The label in a button is considered a caption. Thus, style guides have it these need to be capitalised. Oddly, a few style guides recommend the use of Sentence case rather than Caption Case for captions. See this answer for more.


3

Stick to established patterns where possible. "Save As.." to save the current work into a new file/entry/record (instead of overwriting the existing) is the standard in most software that users will have used before. Clone to me feels like something I'd do before changing something, not after changing it and then wanting to save it as a new copy. An ...


3

Avoid using platform-specific terms as much as possible, especially considering that touch devices are becoming more and more common. In this specific case, I'd avoid the instructions altogether and offer a Download link. Following that link should suggest the browser to save the file instead of opening it, even if it's an image or an HTML page. ...


3

The major problem that I have had when using Clone or Save As when I have dealt with this is generally you don't want an exact copy but rather you are trying to most of the data/information the same and a little bit of data different. Duplicate would be a good verb to describe if you want the entire record to be the same and potentially someone goes and ...


3

To expand on a previous answer by @DA01, I agree that this sounds more like an "About" page than a "Home" style page. Otherwise, your page may have a bit of an identity crisis. Is it clear enough and useful to the customer in that state? [...] Support, etc. Based on that, it sounds like this page may be too general. Support is not usually on an ...


3

It depends on how you are presenting the commenter's name (or not), and how verbose (or not) you want to be, but it could be as simple as: "One guest said:" "From a commenter on this site:" "An unknown visitor" What word would you use to describe the people on your site: Client? Customer? User? Guest? ... Could that word do the job?


3

Vox Populi Literally, "the voice of the people." If someone wants to voice an opinion, but not speak as themselves, they are contributing to the metaphorical 'voice of the people.' You could label all such contributions this way.


3

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


3

I guess if there is something interesting about the company's name, and it fits in with the type of organization (e.g. design agency) then it makes sense to do some somewhere people can see easily. Whether this should be on the home/landing page or not depends on how prominent you will make this, and how often new versus returning users hit the home/landing ...



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