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45

Does the user need to know the specifics of what's happening? Resubscribe or Subscribe would seem to be more consistent for the user as their perspective would be more with regard to whether or not they are receiving the notifications and not so much the how.


41

Answer "No". "Successfully" can be removed: Joel Spolsky covered this issue very well here: http://www.joelonsoftware.com/uibook/chapters/fog0000000062.html The basic rule of thumb is that: "In fact, users don't read anything. This may sound a little harsh, but you'll see, when you do usability tests, that there are quite a few users who simply do ...


22

As noted on the Android Design Principles Writing Style page: Friendly Use contractions. Talk directly to the reader. Use “you” to refer to the reader. Keep your tone casual and conversational, but avoid slang. By saying 'Oops' - in English, a commonly accepted way of acknowledging that an unexpected event has happened, in a non-frightening way - we are ...


22

I wouldn't put pronunciation guide on the company's landing page because it's distracting. Landing pages should focus user's attention on the main content. Instead of a description of how to pronounce the company name, perhaps a description of the site would be much better. Put pronunciation details in the About Us section or footer of the site if people ...


17

One of the clearest examples of those I've seen went something like this: That's it, you've been unsubscribed! Didn't mean to unsubscribe? <Subscribe again>!


16

There is another issue with the word "successful" that I experienced in our SaaS. We provide a function in our application, where you can send stuff via email. However, the only thing we do is to send the email. The message used to be "Email successfully sent." User feedback then made us realize that they got the message more or less wrong as they believed ...


16

If done correctly it could be advantageous from a marketing perspective. As an example, early (admittedly TV) advertisements for Hyundai used the slogan: All day, every day, Hyundai as a way of re-enforcing the pronunciation of the brand name. This was important as if 3 people had 3 different ways of pronouncing it, it'd be unlikely that any would ...


15

You could pick one from thesaurus.com: I personally love the stealthy aspect of anonymous and would choose something like the following: incognito ninja


11

I'm going to disagree with the others and say that sometimes the word successfully is meaningful. I agree that in many cases it is redundant and in those cases is not needed, however there are cases where it is useful. Mostly this applies in partial success cases or cases where you may expect an error. For example if you are validating a hard disk, then ...


9

You are probably asking this because your into implementing it as a developer. The API of the most used map, Google Maps, call these needles for "markers". I'd guess this is the most technically correct word to use. Reference: Google Maps API Markers However I guess your target audience isn't developers and in there daily life call the needles "Pins". And ...


9

If the landing page is for explaining what your company or product is or does, you could emulate a dictionary entry at the top of the landing page. I have seen this done on occasion, but it should only be done if it fits your style. Credits to Google for the original dictionary design


8

If the name is made up of two common words, then putting them together like "MyBrowser" will make it much easier for customers to find you. Otherwise, search engines will look for both words as separate tokens and return a lot more unrelated stuff. Also, having the words together clearly communicates that your name is a name and not a description or tag ...


6

Using informal language makes the error message more human and less intimidating. It also makes the blockage for the user less frustrating if it's language they can find humor or familiarity with. It's very much like adding a quirky illustration such as the Twitter 'fail whale' to lighten the situation. Like using "Error" or "Invalid" it is wise to add a ...


6

How do you think the word "successfully" affects the user experience? Is it something that should go away or is it all right to actually have the word in messages? Ambiguity "Operation X completed" can be ambiguous, for example: Microsoft SQL Server jobs produce messages like this when a job fails. Since the message doesn't always imply a successful ...


6

If the user has just clicked 'Unsubscribe' then you might show 'Resubscribe' to afford them an option to Undo. However, if some time has passed then just show 'Subscribe' as its essentially the same regardless if they were previously in the White List. Or best yet is just to simply say 'Subscribe Again' after the Unsubscribe action. You are preserving ...


6

Why not interactivate? to add or enable the interactivity of something. Boss: "Did you interactivate that screen yet?" Drone: "Yeah, I added the ajax calls and tablesorting last week!" Urban Dictionary


5

How about using "userxxx" or "visitorxxx" where xxx = some number. Eg. user312 (something similar to what is used here at stack exchange) or visitor312 That way the user who is writing the comment need not reveal the identity and the owner of the post does not get the feeling that some random unnamed entity is commenting on his post. Here the presumption ...


5

If these things are strongly correlated in users' minds to geographic locations, then I would certainly try to work "location" or "point" into the name. If these are reports of incidents or conditions, and only weakly correlated to geography, you might call them "issues", "reports", "incidents", etc. All the examples you gave seem to fall more into the ...


5

"I can imagine tha you may get users to read by providing good button labels. If the button label is always "OK" then yes, noone will read anything and just click away. If your button labels provide the action or in Y/N dialogs something like "Yes, do it anyway" you probably have a better chance of people reading the text above (user thinks: "anyway? wait... ...


5

Since it's a CLI, I don't think you need to explain too much. I'm assuming the end user is somewhat tech savvy, so they should be used to doing it the way you describe. My only recommendation is adding a hint at the end. i.e Do you where glasses (y/n):


5

Tracking code is invalid Is it? Is it really? Is there no possibility that the code is actually valid, but not in the system for some reason. Tracking Code was not recognized Not recognized? Did I get the case wrong? Why was it not recognized? Was it my fault or the computer's fault or the company's fault? Neither of these messages really help me ...


4

Vox Populi Literally, "the voice of the people." If someone wants to voice an opinion, but not speak as themselves, they are contributing to the metaphorical 'voice of the people.' You could label all such contributions this way.


4

Looking around there are not any studies I can see as such. Something I would rely on from experience would be consistency. The majority of interfaces use this terminology to describe the action and users understand this. Alternatively you could follow this approach: You do not explicitly say the word hide, but the checkboxes imply it. It would ...


4

Better way for distinguishing would be using different set of image/icon to represent whether user is using desktop or handheld device. Similar to facebook app which shows whether user is login from desktop/web or phone device.


4

Dynamize is the first word that came to mind. It looks like at least one dictionary (AmE) agrees that this word fits: https://www.google.com/search?q=define%3A+dynamize


4

The 5th definition is for dynamic is: Computers. (of data storage, processing, or programming) affected by the passage of time or the presence or absence of power: Dynamic memory must be constantly refreshed to avoid losing data. "Dynamic websites contain Web pages that are generated in real time." Unfortunately, there doesn't seem to be a verb ...


3

It depends on how you are presenting the commenter's name (or not), and how verbose (or not) you want to be, but it could be as simple as: "One guest said:" "From a commenter on this site:" "An unknown visitor" What word would you use to describe the people on your site: Client? Customer? User? Guest? ... Could that word do the job?


3

To expand on a previous answer by @DA01, I agree that this sounds more like an "About" page than a "Home" style page. Otherwise, your page may have a bit of an identity crisis. Is it clear enough and useful to the customer in that state? [...] Support, etc. Based on that, it sounds like this page may be too general. Support is not usually on an ...


3

I guess if there is something interesting about the company's name, and it fits in with the type of organization (e.g. design agency) then it makes sense to do some somewhere people can see easily. Whether this should be on the home/landing page or not depends on how prominent you will make this, and how often new versus returning users hit the home/landing ...


3

When I see companies do what you describe (on the front/landing page), it comes across as pretentious and desperate, and reeks to me like they're trying to build their business based more around their image than their service. Givenchy, Guerlain, Gaultier...some of the top fashion houses in the world. Everybody mispronounces their names, but even they don't ...



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