Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I typically make wireframes as lo-fi as I can get away with, in order to keep clients focused on features, functionality, and hierarchy. I don't lay pages out using a particular grid. Sometimes I'll indicate roughly where the "fold" is, but that's as specific as I'll get. The Visual Design team then designs the actual layouts using grids and guidelines and ...


1

It really depends on how your company is using wireframes and what iteration you are currently on. In my experience, the final approved version of a wireframe should be a fairly close representation of what the mockups will be delivering. There is still plenty of room to change the layout or functionality before it goes to a prototyping phase, which is why ...


0

Speaking from my own experiences. Obviously it would be ideal for the (last iteration of the) wireframe to be the final layout. But in practice that won't always be the case. The wireframe was laid out the way it was for a reason so you should avoid changing it late in the process, but if you come across a valid reason to make alterations then you should ...


1

Totally agree with Rolland. I'll suggest you to think about usage of each one of this thing. Mockup : is often referring to "zoning", I always start with this one. Using it to place elements and informations on page templates. Wireframes : looks really often like what the other one answers, I'll add a little precision, you're supposed to use real content ...


1

In my 8 years of experience I have never found that this is used consistently, you cannot rely on meaning the same thing if someone talk about a wireframe or a mockup. Especially about Mockups: Some visual designer call a high fidelty visual design a mockup, some UX people call a very low fidelity thing a mockup. I recommend to show examples if you want to ...


1

Wireframes are schematics that display basic elements without going into details. Prototype is a detailed simulation of the future design, often to a point where it's mimicking the interaction. It can be created on paper, with a specific program or by coding up the dummy data and/or services. Mock-up is a class of designs that include both wireframes, ...


1

A wireframe is a outline sketch of layout. It doesn't look anything like the real finished product. It just shows where the various elements will be. A prototype and a mock-up....there we don't have exact definitions and ways of differentiating them. I would say that "mock-up" to me sounds like something that is still in fairly early stages whilst a ...


0

I'm afraid I don't have time to answer this in full right now, but I'll come back to it if I can. I would suggest exploring tools such as usability hub and their offshoot 'peek' before doing a live test. They're pretty helpful. Second I would underline how important it is to observe use as naturally as possible. Note 'observe'. For fundamental usability ...


1

It sounds you want to determine what it is better to do: a more or less conducted usability exploration in your project. I tipically choose a more 'relaxed' session with participants and no strict procedures when: I need general feedback of usefulness and usability of early ideas I know who the user is (users like, people from companies that share the ...


1

both approaches are OK, but it also depends on your project. For example, if it's an informational site it will be different to an action oriented app, and if it's an action oriented app, it could be very different if it's something casual or an app for extreme users. Also, it all depends on the features, if they're common or very technical, and so on. ...


0

I would personally just let them attempt a complete walkthrough as a user and see if they are able to do so. Because when you deploy the platform you will not be able to guide them through, so the best way to see where you fail in user experience development is allowing users to do it themselves. When we were doing similar testing on my platform. We allowed ...



Top 50 recent answers are included