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Is FILE a blindly accepted standard: Yes. UI experts have argued against it, but nobody's going to change something that's been in both Mac and Windows GUIs since, forever. The whole metaphor of a computer working with files and folders kind of requires a File menu. Are the commands in the File menu about the File you are working on? Yes and no. You are ...


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As far as I can tell, there is no good reason for it. The behavior was started by Microsoft (Windows) and sadly taken over in other user interfaces such as KDE. Here is some more e-mail conversation going on about the subject. Many people (including mysef) find it annoying for the simple reason that you look at the windows contents while dragging and ...


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I believe it’s a means of providing the ability to cancel a half-executed command. Imagine a user is 45% down a long page. The user attempts to perform a drag operation on the contents of the window (maybe to move an icon or select some text), but accidentally “catches” the scrollbar slider instead, resulting in scrolling page to X% down, and leaving the ...


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A UI should always function in a way which is plausible to the mind of the user, based on their experience of manipulating objects in the real world. The scroll bar is locked to either vertical or horizontal movement. If you drag your mouse pointer too far in a direction where the scroll can't follow, then at some point it is illogical for the scroll to keep ...


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Because it represents a basic or elementary action that needs to be accessible even for somebody who does not really see the "big picture" of how the relations of application and windows work, or is not really understanding the very concept of window handling. Try to talk to someone new to computers on the phone - it's all about "That thing to the right ...


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This is an old element inherited since Windows 3.1 where the interface of the applications didn't have the, now common, "X" to close them. Before, on the top right there was a menu that you could access with the combination Alt+space and one of the options, the main one, was close. The double click basically activates the main option of that menu. At some ...


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I've always wondered the same thing but I've never found an explanation from the source. The confounding part is that using a highly saturated "warning" color is in direct opposition to the fact that it is a destructive action. What they've achieved is undue emphasis. I tend to think there is more style than substance in this choice. Microsoft was once ...


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Well, when you close an application it is gone. The Windows OS has no control over how software developed by third-parties will handle this very final action. It is up to the developer to ensure that the state is saved. Will they prompt the user to save their work? Will the browser store the last page you were at if you close it accidentally? Who knows? In ...


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This is purely a matter of visual cognition - if the visual design makes it easy to group related elements, there is no problem putting anything anywhere, including buttons on a tab space. So long users can interpret the tabs as tabs and buttons (or other elements) as such, there shouldn't be a problem. In the top example, the distinction is fairly clear - ...


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Your UX is all about "change the template". The required template may be (a) the default or (b) local file. In future say a selection from most recently used file list or a resource from a shared template library is useful. You could display this domain model this flat in the UI much as you have. But if extra capability or clarity is needed, then could ...


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You might be overthinking this "problem". The functionality is simple and everything is accessible with as few clicks as possible. Only thing I would suggest is to alter the wording and say "Reset to Default" for lesser ambiguity. If you want users then to be able to (re)select their previous templates easier, you should have the field to transform to a ...


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I think a combination of the two would work. We do this a lot inhouse where we have to highlight a selection for the user so that when they are scanning the dropdown, they can easily see their current selection. BUT, because you are also indicating an image is attached, I do like the suggestion of adding some visual treatment near the control showing that ...


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Since you're using (what looks to me) a standard component I assume that customization is limited. Therefore I would suggest that you use something that is easily accomplished, noticeable and recognizable. The Unicode for the paperclip would probably work great. That cues that there's something attached to the item (an image), it's clearly visible ...


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The feature you're looking for is called (by Microsoft) the "Color hot-track". As described by Raymond Chen in this MSDN blog article: Some people ask how it's done. It's really nothing special. The code just looks for the predominant color in the icon. (And, since visual designers are sticklers for this sort of thing, black, white, and shades of ...



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