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Because a lot of the time it's a good idea. Way back when I had a Unix GUI set up not to do this and it was just as annoying as focus-on-open. The problem is this: most of the time when you open a program, it's because you want to interact with it. Not switching to the new application immediately means that your starting a program process requires a ...


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Because it represents a basic or elementary action that needs to be accessible even for somebody who does not really see the "big picture" of how the relations of application and windows work, or is not really understanding the very concept of window handling. Try to talk to someone new to computers on the phone - it's all about "That thing to the right ...


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The green button isn't for maximizing. If you want to maximize, use the "fullscreen" button in the upper right of the window: The zoom button is intended to make the window the best possible size that shows the most of the window's content. This is the most useful when working with multiple windows, because you see as much as your screen will hold, but it ...


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The window expands to fit the content, and don't add additional whitespace like windows OS does. Now let’s look at Apple’s website in Safari. Notice the first image below is a very small window with both vertical and horizontal scrollbars. The second image shows what the window looks like after clicking the Zoom button. Again, it takes up all of the ...


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This is an old element inherited since Windows 3.1 where the interface of the applications didn't have the, now common, "X" to close them. Before, on the top right there was a menu that you could access with the combination Alt+space and one of the options, the main one, was close. The double click basically activates the main option of that menu. At some ...


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I've always wondered the same thing but I've never found an explanation from the source. The confounding part is that using a highly saturated "warning" color is in direct opposition to the fact that it is a destructive action. What they've achieved is undue emphasis. I tend to think there is more style than substance in this choice. Microsoft was once ...


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Well, when you close an application it is gone. The Windows OS has no control over how software developed by third-parties will handle this very final action. It is up to the developer to ensure that the state is saved. Will they prompt the user to save their work? Will the browser store the last page you were at if you close it accidentally? Who knows? In ...



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